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Is it legal to share a flat in Dubai?

Khaleej Times logo Khaleej Times 09/07/2017 Ashish Mehta
Is it legal to share a flat in Dubai? © Provided by Khaleej Times Is it legal to share a flat in Dubai?

My friends and I are looking to rent an apartment in the Dubai Marina for one year. We are unmarried women who are not related. Is it even legal for us to share an apartment if we are not related? I understand only one of us can have our name on the rent contract. We will divide the rent equally among us. Since the rent contract will be under my name, I am worried that I could be held liable if something goes wrong. Is there any way I can make my two potential roommates sign a legal agreement holding them liable for any rent arrears, damages to apartment etc, too?

Pursuant to your questions, we assume that the landlord is not interested to make you and your two friends party to the tenancy contract and therefore you are singly signing the tenancy contract with the landlord. Once you sign the tenancy contract and issue the rent cheques to the landlord, you will be solely responsible if anything happens in the rented premises as you are the lawful tenant.

However, it is suggested that you inform the landlord that two of your friends are going to reside with you and you obtain the written consent of the landlord to this effect. In the event your friends don't pay their share of rent to and damages the apartment, you will be held responsible. Further you may contact the Dubai Real Estate Regulatory Authority.

KNOW THE LAW

"It is suggested that you inform the landlord that two of your friends are going to reside with you and you obtain the written consent of the landlord to this effect."

It's better to resign after probation period

I am working for a hospital based in a free zone in Dubai. I am in my probation period and want to resign from this job as it is very stressful. I belong to the skill level 1 category. My contract is for two years, but my employment visa is stamped for three years. I would like to know if I leave this job in my probation period, will I have to pay the company anything? Can they put a ban on me? What are the other formalities I should bear in mind before resigning in my probation period?

Pursuant to your queries, it is preferred that you resign from your employment upon completion of probation period to avoid any unforeseen circumstances. Employment contract and residence visa are not the same even they are linked to each other. Employment contract or work permit is the permission to work in the UAE, whereas residence visa is the permission to reside in the country - both are two different aspects. Since you have mentioned you are skill level 1 employee, there may not be an employment ban on you. This is in accordance with article 4 (a) of the ministerial resolution no. 1186 for 2010 regulating rules and conditions of granting a new work permit to an employee after termination of the work relationship in order to move from one establishment to another.

It states: "As an exception to the provision of item no. 2 of article 2 of this resolution, the ministry may issue a work permit to the employee without requiring the two-year period in the following case:

(a) In the event that the employee is starting his new position at the first, second or third professional levels after fulfilling the conditions for joining any of these levels according to the rules in force at the ministry and provided that his new wage is not less than Dh12,000 at the first professional level; Dh7,000 at the second professional level; and Dh5,000 at the third professional level." Further, the same has been mentioned in article 1 of the ministerial decree number 766 of 2015 on rules and conditions for granting a permit to an employee for employment by a new employer.

You are not liable to pay your employer anything if you serve the notice period and resign in accordance with the provisions of your employment contract.

KNOW THE LAW

"You are not liable to pay your employer anything if you serve the notice period and resign in accordance with the provisions of your employment contract."

Ashish Mehta is the founder and Managing Partner of Ashish Mehta & Associates. He is qualified to practise law in Dubai, the United Kingdom, Singapore and India. Full details of his firm on: www.amalawyers.com. Readers may e-mail their questions to: news@khaleejtimes.com or send them to Legal View, Khaleej Times, PO Box 11243, Dubai.

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