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​5 Signs Your Bloating Isn't Normal

Prevention Logo By Hallie Levine of Prevention | Slide 1 of 5: <p>Although rare, it could indicate ovarian cancer, especially if it’s accompanied by other symptoms such as feeling full quickly while eating and suddenly having to pee or poop a lot. “This is caused by an accumulation of fluid in the abdomen, a condition called ascites, and/or pressure from an ovarian mass against your abdomen or pelvis,” explains Steve Vasilev, MD, gynecologic oncologist and medical director of Integrative Gynecologic Oncology at John Wayne Cancer Institute in Santa Monica, CA. But only about a third of all women are aware that any of these symptoms are a sign of ovarian cancer, according to a study published this past April in the journal <a href="http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1054773817704749">Clinical Nursing Research</a>. (These are the <a href="http://www.prevention.com/health/what-every-woman-needs-to-know-about-ovarian-cancer">eight things every woman needs to know about ovarian cancer</a>.) </p><p><strong>What to do:</strong> Don't panic, since most of the time these symptoms point to a more benign condition, such as fibroids. But you should see your doctor ASAP to get checked out. The two tests used most often to screen for ovarian cancer are transvaginal ultrasound (a test that uses sound waves to look for masses on your ovaries) and the CA-125 blood test (if you have ovarian cancer, levels of the protein CA-125 are high).</p><p><strong>PREVENTION PREMIUM: </strong><a href="http://www.prevention.com/health/uterine-fibroid-treatment">5 Major Risk Factors For Fibroids, And Your Best Treatment Options</a></p>

Pelvic pain

Although rare, it could indicate ovarian cancer, especially if it’s accompanied by other symptoms such as feeling full quickly while eating and suddenly having to pee or poop a lot. “This is caused by an accumulation of fluid in the abdomen, a condition called ascites, and/or pressure from an ovarian mass against your abdomen or pelvis,” explains Steve Vasilev, MD, gynecologic oncologist and medical director of Integrative Gynecologic Oncology at John Wayne Cancer Institute in Santa Monica, CA. But only about a third of all women are aware that any of these symptoms are a sign of ovarian cancer, according to a study published this past April in the journal Clinical Nursing Research. 

What to do: Don't panic, since most of the time these symptoms point to a more benign condition, such as fibroids. But you should see your doctor ASAP to get checked out. The two tests used most often to screen for ovarian cancer are transvaginal ultrasound (a test that uses sound waves to look for masses on your ovaries) and the CA-125 blood test (if you have ovarian cancer, levels of the protein CA-125 are high).

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