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10 Myths about Hydration You Need to Stop Believing Right Now

Reader's Digest Logo By Lindsay Tigar of Reader's Digest | Slide 1 of 10: <p>Actually, your thirst sensations are a pretty sensitive gauge of your fluid levels. (By the way, if <a href='http://www.rd.com/health/wellness/always-thirsty/1'>you're always thirsty, make sure it's not for one of these eight reasons</a>.) 'Dehydration is the body's natural loss of water through sweat, tears, and breathing. The kidneys control the water balance in the body, and when they sense the need for more water replacement, it sends a message to our brains to drink more water by making us feel thirsty,' explains <a href='http://www.culinarymednyc.com'>kidney specialist Dara Huang, MD</a>, founder of New York Culinary Medicine.</p>

Myth: If you're thirsty, you're already dehydrated

Actually, your thirst sensations are a pretty sensitive gauge of your fluid levels. (By the way, if you're always thirsty, make sure it's not for one of these eight reasons.) 'Dehydration is the body's natural loss of water through sweat, tears, and breathing. The kidneys control the water balance in the body, and when they sense the need for more water replacement, it sends a message to our brains to drink more water by making us feel thirsty,' explains kidney specialist Dara Huang, MD, founder of New York Culinary Medicine.

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