You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

This is the best water temperature to brush your teeth with - and what you should use to rinse them

Mirror logo Mirror 25/04/2017 Zahra Mulroy

Credits: YouTube © Provided by Trinity Mirror Plc Credits: YouTube The mouth and the body are fundamental to one another.

With oral health repeatedly linked to our overall, general health, getting it right is crucial.

Modern life doesn't always make it easy for us to take care of ourselves.

Then there's the wealth of conflicting information out there about everything from how often we should brush our teeth to the temperature of water we should use.

So what is the optimal dental hygiene routine?

Celebrity dentist Dr Richard Marques is known as The King of Smiles for his knack in helping the rich and famous achieve a dazzling, pearly white grin.

He recently spoke to The Sun to reveal the dental hygiene habits we should all be adopting.

Try warm water

London based Dr Marques explained: "Cold is the normal type of water to use when brushing your teeth as it has that refreshing and clarifying feeling, although warm water can be good if you have sensitive teeth (as the cold affects teeth)."

But he advised avoiding using hot water.

"Very hot water can however damage the bristles of your toothbrush in the long term, as well as the added risk of burning your mouth."

Credits: Getty © Provided by Trinity Mirror Plc Credits: Getty

Dr Marques also suggested the following.

By swapping a manual toothbrush for an electric one you'll experience a more thorough method of cleaning.

Electric toothbrushes also prevent you from brushing too hard because they basically do all the work for you.

Bleeding gums?

It might sound counter-intuitive, but you should continue to keep brushing.

Dr Marques assures us that they will eventually heal and change from being inflamed and bleeding to being healthy and pink.

A good substitute for mouthwash is COCONUT OIL.

Coconut oil is particularly effective because it removes plaque and toxins from between the teeth.

And of course, pop in and see your dentist every six months.

One year on from your last appointment and gum disease is likely to have set in, painful and resulting in bleeding gums.

You have been warned.

More from The Mirror

image beaconimage beaconimage beacon