You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

What Your Eye Color Says About Your Health

Refinery29 logo Refinery29 12/05/2017 Sarah Jacoby
Refinery29 © Photographed by Winnie Au. Refinery29

Aside from whether or not you actually need those trendy frames, doctors can learn a lot about your overall health just from looking at your eyes. Conditions such as diabetes, high blood pressure, and even brain tumors leave their mark on your baby blues — sometimes without even affecting your vision.

In fact, your eye color can actually be a hint about your risk for certain health problems. That certainly doesn't mean your eye color is somehow causing those conditions — or that having a certain color means you're definitely doomed to develop a certain problem — but knowing that color is correlated with those issues can help you be more aware of what you're up against, and how best to stay healthy.

Light eyes: If your eyes are blue, green, or gray, you may be at a higher risk for skin cancer than those with darker eyes, Ruth Williams, MD tells Everyday Health (though those with dark eyes also need to be careful about sunscreen use and getting regular mole checks with a derm). You're also more likely to develop age-related macular degeneration, one of the most common causes of vision loss. But you're at a lower risk for cataracts and vitiligo.

Dark eyes: If your eyes are brown or hazel, research suggests that you're more likely to have cataracts later in your life than those with lighter eyes. You're also more likely to develop vitiligo, a condition in which some of your melanin cells stop working properly which leaves you with patches of skin without pigment. On the flip side, you're less likely to develop skin cancer and macular degeneration.

Changing colors: In some cases, a sudden change in eye color can be a signal of a serious health issue. If your eyes are suddenly red, for instance, that's a sign of irritation, infection, or allergies. And if the whites of your eyes turn yellow, that's a classic indication of jaundice: meaning you need medical attention ASAP.

Of course, you should check in with your doc anytime you're concerned about a potential health issue — whether or not your eyes are your clue.

12 Things That Happen to Your Body When You Eat Eggs: <p>By Grant Stoddard</p><p>Eggs might just be the easiest, cheapest and most versatile way to up your protein intake.</p><p>Beyond easily upping your daily protein count— each 85-calorie eggs packs a solid 7 grams of the muscle-builder—eggs also boost your health. They’re loaded with amino acids, antioxidants and iron. Don't just reach for the whites, though; the yolks boast a fat-fighting nutrient called choline, so opting for whole eggs can actually help you trim down.</p><p>When you're shopping for eggs, pay attention to the labels. You should be buying organic, when possible. These are certified by the USDA and are free from antibiotics, vaccines and hormones. As for color, that's your call. The difference in color just varies based on the type of chicken—they both have the same nutritional value, says Molly Morgan, RD, a board certified sports specialist dietician based in upstate New York. Here are 12 incredible effects the mighty egg can have on the human body.</p><p>And to blast fat fast—and live your healthiest, happiest life—don't miss these <a href="http://www.eatthis.com/how-to-lose-10-pounds-fast">50 Ways to Lose 10 Pounds—Fast</a>!</p> 12 Things That Happen to Your Body When You Eat Eggs

More from Refinery29

image beaconimage beaconimage beacon