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This croissant hides an exotic secret

Daily Mail logo Daily Mail 8/04/2021 Alice Murphy For Daily Mail Australia
a close up of food: MailOnline logo © Provided by Daily Mail MailOnline logo

A Sydney bakery has blended two of the world's most iconic treats into one delicious dessert.

The snack is a baklava croissant, stuffed with an assortment of nuts, honey, lemon clove syrup and indulgent pistachio cream.

It's the latest creation from Banksia Bakehouse, a boutique cafe in the CBD known for its rotating menu of experimental desserts.

Customers have been drooling over the exotic creation since the first photo was uploaded to the bakery's Instagram feed on Wednesday, with comments including 'oh my god, this sounds delicious' and 'I need this in my life ASAP'. 

a piece of food on a plate: Sydney bakery Banksia Bakehouse's baklava croissant, stuffed with an assortment of nuts, honey, lemon clove syrup and a rich pistachio cream © Provided by Daily Mail Sydney bakery Banksia Bakehouse's baklava croissant, stuffed with an assortment of nuts, honey, lemon clove syrup and a rich pistachio cream

Banksia Bakehouse head baker Chris Sheldrick said the inspiration behind the croissant came from the pastry chefs' personal love of baklava, a filo pastry believed to originate from Turkey that has long been the Middle East's best-known dessert.

'We thought it would be awesome to create something out of the two things they love - baklava and croissants,' Mr Sheldrick told Daily Mail Australia.

'Most people think of France and Paris as a home of pastries and baked sweets, but the Middle East has a long rich history of fantastic pastries and the baklava is one of the most familiar.'


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The croissant will be available from the bakery at 225 George Street until April 30, when a new tranche of decadent desserts will be rolled out. 

a slice of cake sitting on top of a piece of bread: Banksia Bakehouse head baker Chris Sheldrick said the inspiration behind the croissant (pictured) came from the pastry chefs' personal love of baklava © Provided by Daily Mail Banksia Bakehouse head baker Chris Sheldrick said the inspiration behind the croissant (pictured) came from the pastry chefs' personal love of baklava Just seven months since opening in August 2020, Banksia Bakehouse (pictured) has cemented its reputation as one of Sydney's finest bakeries thanks to its unique take on traditional treats © Provided by Daily Mail Just seven months since opening in August 2020, Banksia Bakehouse (pictured) has cemented its reputation as one of Sydney's finest bakeries thanks to its unique take on traditional treats

Just seven months since opening in August 2020, Banksia Bakehouse has cemented its reputation as one of Sydney's finest bakeries thanks to its unique take on traditional treats.

In March, it launched a special Easter-inspired treat - the hot cross croissant, a fusion of the classic croissant and hot cross bun crafted from dough moulded into a cube that's crisscrossed with lashings of white icing.

The two-in-one sweet, which is also available until April 30, is stuffed with a rich cinnamon cream and Australian sultanas. 

a piece of chocolate cake on a table: Meet the hot cross croissant: Banksia Bakehouse in Sydney's CBD has created this two-in-one dessert, which is a fusion of the classic croissant and hot cross bun © Provided by Daily Mail Meet the hot cross croissant: Banksia Bakehouse in Sydney's CBD has created this two-in-one dessert, which is a fusion of the classic croissant and hot cross bun a piece of cake on a table: The two-in-one sweet is stuffed with a rich cinnamon cream and Australian sultanas © Provided by Daily Mail The two-in-one sweet is stuffed with a rich cinnamon cream and Australian sultanas

The bakery, which is open from 7:30am to 4:30pm from Monday to Friday, uses locally grown ingredients from Australian producers wherever possible - in this case, Sunmuscat sultanas from a family-owned farm in Mildura, VIC.

Mr Sheldrick said the special croissant was developed as a 'special Easter treat' that is different to the traditional fare stocked in supermarkets across Australia.

'With hot cross buns appearing in shops right after Christmas, we didn’t want to create a traditional-style bun as we felt customers would be tired of them by the time Easter actually came around,' he said.

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