You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

Pauline Hanson slips into wetsuit for reef trip

AAP logoAAP 25/11/2016 Melissa Grant

Pauline Hanson has slipped into a wetsuit and made a splash on the Great Barrier Reef to show the world the natural wonder is worth visiting amid claims it is dying.

The senator, who once cooked fish for a living, went swimming off Great Keppel Island today and expressed concerns about reports on the reef's health.

Ms Hanson says agenda-driven groups are telling "untruths" about the state of the reef that are harming the tourism industry and businesses.

Pauline Hanson snorkels on the Great Barrier Reef near Great Keppel Island. © AAP Image/Dan Peled Pauline Hanson snorkels on the Great Barrier Reef near Great Keppel Island. "When we have these agendas that are actually destroying our tourism industry and businesses ... we need to ask the questions and we want answers," she said.

"The Greens have no concern about people and jobs that we need here in Queensland, and the escalating costs that we are feeling from the effects of this."

One Nation senators Malcolm Roberts, who has long argued the case that global warming doesn't stack up, and Brian Burston were also on the reef trip.

Mr Roberts said people had stopped coming to the reef because they were being told it was dead and that Australia should not be reporting on its health to the UN agency UNESCO.

Pauline Hanson adjusts her goggles while snorkelling on the Great Barrier Reef. © AAP Image/Dan Peled Pauline Hanson adjusts her goggles while snorkelling on the Great Barrier Reef. Conservationists are concerned climate change is putting severe stress on the reef, which experienced a massive coral bleaching event this year, and some have declared it's dying at an unprecedented rate.

They say Ms Hanson and her senators visited the wrong part of the reef as the southern sections had been least affected by the worst bleaching event in the icon's history.

The World Wildlife Fund said One Nation should have visited Lizard Island where bleaching, caused by high water temperatures, has killed much of the coral.

Pauline Hanson (R) listens to marine scientist Alison Jones as she touches a piece of coral. © AAP Image/Dan Peled Pauline Hanson (R) listens to marine scientist Alison Jones as she touches a piece of coral.
image beaconimage beaconimage beacon