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Where YOU can catch a glimpse of the lunar eclipse: Millions of Australians will see 60% of the moon hidden in Earth's shadow in HOURS - as the best places to watch the phenomenon are revealed

Daily Mail logo Daily Mail 16/07/2019 Alana Mazzoni and Joe Pinkstone

A partial lunar eclipse happens when Earth moves between the sun and the moon, but the three celestial bodies don't form a straight line in space © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited A partial lunar eclipse happens when Earth moves between the sun and the moon, but the three celestial bodies don't form a straight line in space Early-rising Australians will be treated to a party in the sky on Wednesday morning, when a partial lunar eclipse fills the skies. 

However catching a glimpse of the lunar eclipse depends on where in the country you live, with Western Australians set to be treated to the best views.  

'For the eastern states it'll be obvious that there's that chunk out, for the west it will be very, very clear that there's an eclipse happening,' Sydney Observatory's Andrew Jacob told the ABC. 

A partial lunar eclipse happens when Earth moves between the sun and the moon, but the three celestial bodies don't form a straight line in space. 

When this occurs, a small part of the moon's surface is covered by the darkest, central part of the Earth's shadow. 

Aussies are being urged to make the most of the light show, as this will be the last lunar eclipse of any type that we will be able to see until 2021.  

Nearly half of the full moon will go dark at the peak of the eclipse, but only people in Western Australia will see the full light show from start to finish. 

'The west will see the bottom right hand half of the Moon in shadow, in eclipse and nice and dark before the Moon sets,'  Mr Jacob said. 

The country's eastern states will see the moon set below the horizon before the maximum eclipse, and is on the horizon at moonset. 

Where to catch a glimpse from your city 

Sydney - partial eclipse begins at 6.01am and visible until 6.55am 

Melbourne - partial eclipse at 6.01am with maximum eclipse at 7.30am and moonset at 7.38

Perth - partial eclipse at 4.01am with maximum eclipse at 5.30am, partial eclipse ending at 6.59 and moonset at 7.24  

Brisbane - partial eclipse begins at 6.01am and visible until 6.37

Adelaide - partial eclipse at 5.31 with maximum eclipse at 7.00am and moonset at 7.27

Canberra - partial eclipse at 6.01am and visible until 7.11

Darwin -  partial eclipse begins at 5.31am with maximum eclipse at 7.00am and moonset at 7.13

Hobart -  partial eclipse begins at 6.01am and visible until 6.55am  

All times are local 

Everyone in Australia will be able to see the beginning of the partial eclipse at the same time, but some parts of the country will have a better view than others.  

Perth locals wanting to catch a glimpse will need to head to bed early on Tuesday, with the eclipse starting at 4.01am, and the maximum eclipse taking place at 5.30. 

Sydneysiders and Hobart locals will get a slight sleep in if they wish to see the eclipse, as it's visible from 6.01am for nearly an hour until 6.55. 

Melbourne residents will be treated to more than an hour-and-a-half of sky lights, with the eclipse visible from 6.01am, maximum eclipse at 7.30 and moonset at 7.38. 

A partial lunar eclipse is set to be visible across much of the world tonight if clear weather and conditions remain clear.

The event will be seen in the UK and will also take place over much of Asia, Africa, and eastern parts of South America. 

Around 60 per cent of the lunar surface will be obscured behind the shadow of Earth as the Sun, Earth and the moon align. 

The event is particularly special for stargazers, as the date coincides with the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11 launching on its moon mission. 

A lunar eclipse occurs when the Earth, sun, and moon are almost exactly in line and the moon is on the opposite side of the Earth from the sun.

The moon is full, moves into the shadow of the Earth and dims dramatically but usually remains visible, lit by sunlight that passes through the Earth's atmosphere.

According to the Royal Astronomical Society, mid-eclipse is expected to take place at 10.30pm, when about 60 per cent of the visible surface of the moon will be covered by the umbra.

It can sometimes take on a red hue as people observing from the ground witness the after effects of the powerful atmospheric scattering of blue light hitting the surface.

Viewing the lunar eclipse will be easy, simply look at the sky, but those with clearer skies and less obscured views will get the most spectacular views. No glass or eye protection is needed (file photo) © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Viewing the lunar eclipse will be easy, simply look at the sky, but those with clearer skies and less obscured views will get the most spectacular views. No glass or eye protection is needed (file photo)

Viewing the lunar eclipse will be easy, simply look at the sky, but those with clearer skies and less obscured views will get the most spectacular views. 

No glass or eye protection is needed as a lunar eclipse is notably less bright than a solar eclipse. 

However, those seeking to soak in the event in all its glory should seek areas bereft of tall buildings as well as places without much light pollution.  

'You're looking for anywhere that has a low unobstructed horizon, no tall buildings and trees in the way,' said Dr Morgan Hollis from the Royal Astronomical Society.

'Unlike a solar eclipse it's entirely safe to watch a lunar eclipse with the naked eye, so this one is fine, you don't need any special equipment and it should be fairly warm as well, given temperatures recently, it should be good if the weather is clear and the conditions are clear.'

Pictures: 2019 supermoon and total lunar eclipse


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