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What will the population of these 40 countries be in 2030?

Stacker Logo By Frederick Reese of Stacker | Slide 1 of 41: One-quarter of a billion people live outside their home countries, according to the Council on Foreign Relations. A full 10% of those individuals are refugees fleeing violence, persecution, hunger, and other threats. This record level of displacement has significant effects on communities, national economies, and social services around the world as populations dwindle in some countries and spike (sometimes very quickly) in others.

At first glance, moves to harden national borders may be read as xenophobia or the fear or hatred of anything foreign or culturally strange. A deeper look, however, suggests that the influx of minority groups into places like the U.K. and the United States may trigger  “white fear,” or the concept that demographic changes may stir fears of status change among socioeconomic groups or possibly even the end of a majority. Immigration played into the Brexit vote, while  In the United States, the Trump administration has drastically reduced admissions of refugees, canceled DACA, and terminated Temporary Protected Status designations for Sudan, Haiti, and Nicaragua—in addition to instating a Muslim ban.

Of course, migration isn't the only factor affecting population growth. Birth and death rates, access to education, social services, family planning services, employment, and women's participation in the labor market all contribute to ebbs and flows of a country's population—proving the world is a complicated place and a difficult one to forecast.

Understanding how and why people move can help bring understanding to some larger geopolitical issues. For example, while Brexit can be seen as a protest against open-ended refugee and migrant-acceptance policies, the reason migrants wanted to go to the U.K. in the first place is that they feel they can get a shot at a better life there than they did at home. Similarities can be found in refugees' stories in every country.

With the 2019 world population estimated at 7.7 billion and estimated forecasts for 2030 reaching 8.5 billion people, Stacker took a closer look at how country's populations are changing around the world. We analyzed data from the  United Nations Population Division to determine how country populations will change by 2030. Stacker specifically looked at population predictions of 40 nations: the top 10 nations by population, the bottom 10 by population, the top 10 by projected population growth, and the bottom 10 by projected population growth.

We evaluated 2019 population estimates and 2030 population projections for all 195 member and non-member observer states of the United Nations. From there, we determined the countries projected to be biggest, smallest, fastest-growing, and fastest-shrinking by 2030—including the 10 highest-ranked countries for each criterion.

Keep reading to learn why Eastern Europeans are more likely than not to migrate from home.

You may also like: 50 ways the U.S. population has changed in the last 50 years

What will the population of these 40 countries be in 2030?

One-quarter of a billion people live outside their home countries, according to the Council on Foreign Relations. A full 10% of those individuals are refugees fleeing violence, persecution, hunger, and other threats. This record level of displacement has significant effects on communities, national economies, and social services around the world as populations dwindle in some countries and spike (sometimes very quickly) in others.

At first glance, moves to harden national borders may be read as xenophobia or the fear or hatred of anything foreign or culturally strange. A deeper look, however, suggests that the influx of minority groups into places like the U.K. and the United States may trigger “white fear,” or the concept that demographic changes may stir fears of status change among socioeconomic groups or possibly even the end of a majority. Immigration played into the Brexit vote, while  In the United States, the Trump administration has drastically reduced admissions of refugees, canceled DACA, and terminated Temporary Protected Status designations for Sudan, Haiti, and Nicaragua—in addition to instating a Muslim ban.

Of course, migration isn't the only factor affecting population growth. Birth and death rates, access to education, social services, family planning services, employment, and women's participation in the labor market all contribute to ebbs and flows of a country's population—proving the world is a complicated place and a difficult one to forecast.

Understanding how and why people move can help bring understanding to some larger geopolitical issues. For example, while Brexit can be seen as a protest against open-ended refugee and migrant-acceptance policies, the reason migrants wanted to go to the U.K. in the first place is that they feel they can get a shot at a better life there than they did at home. Similarities can be found in refugees' stories in every country.

With the 2019 world population estimated at 7.7 billion and estimated forecasts for 2030 reaching 8.5 billion people, Stacker took a closer look at how country's populations are changing around the world. We analyzed data from the United Nations Population Division to determine how country populations will change by 2030. Stacker specifically looked at population predictions of 40 nations: the top 10 nations by population, the bottom 10 by population, the top 10 by projected population growth, and the bottom 10 by projected population growth.

We evaluated 2019 population estimates and 2030 population projections for all 195 member and non-member observer states of the United Nations. From there, we determined the countries projected to be biggest, smallest, fastest-growing, and fastest-shrinking by 2030—including the 10 highest-ranked countries for each criterion.

Keep reading to learn why Eastern Europeans are more likely than not to migrate from home.

You may also like: 50 ways the U.S. population has changed in the last 50 years

© Don Mammoser // Shuttestock

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