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Tech & Science

Caught red-handed: Security devices for your home

9News.com.au logo 9News.com.au 13/06/2018 Lauren Golman

Calculated, brazen, and caught red handed.

Having a sneaking suspicion that someone had broken into their home before, Rick and Bev Crouch decided to install cameras in every room of their home. And it's thanks to those cameras (and their thief's stupidity) that he was caught in the act.

We can't reveal this burglar's name and we've had to blur his face for legal reasons, as he's currently before the courts for not one, but two, break and enters. But we'll come back to that in a moment.

a man posing for the camera: Rick Crouch said he and his wife Bev installed cameras throughout their house after suspecting they had been broken into. © Provided by Nine Digital Pty Ltd Rick Crouch said he and his wife Bev installed cameras throughout their house after suspecting they had been broken into.

"It was actually the next day that Bev got out of bed and noticed that one of our cameras had moved. She asked me if I had moved the camera, I said no, so then we went to our recorded footage, and we then came across this fella coming through the window, going through everything in the house, and then we realised all our jewellery was gone," Mr Crouch told A Current Affair.

Rick estimates the thief stole $20,000 worth of sentimental goods, including Bev's engagement ring and a charm bracelet she's cherished for years.

"I bought Bev's engagement ring when I was 18 so it's a long time ago, and it's not about what it's worth to me, it's the fact that it's something I gave her when we first met. And it's gone," said Mr Crouch.

"Everything gold, diamond, that sparkled he took. It was dreadful to watch. Knowing that he's been through my drawers, and it wasn't just one drawer, it was all my drawers, every single drawer. Going through my underwear and everything," Mrs Crouch said.

The CCTV shows the thief entering the Crouch home in broad daylight, making his way through different parts of the home, and then making his way to the master bedroom.

"He went through the top drawer, got a couple old wallets in there so he went through the wallets," said Mr Crouch.

The thief isn't satisfied yet, making his way to other drawers on the other side of the room where Bev's jewellery was hidden inside a set of drawers.

Security cameras captured a brazen break-and-enter into a couple's home. © Provided by Nine Digital Pty Ltd Security cameras captured a brazen break-and-enter into a couple's home.

This thief may have been calculated, but he was dumb, moving a camera hidden behind a picture frame to reveal his face. And that's just where he came unstuck.

"So the camera was here, he's actually moved it to get my jewellery box, and you can see in the reflection in the mirror, him looking at my jewellery on the bed," said Mrs Crouch.

It's frightening to watch. Brazen thieves lurking, scoping out homes, some stealing mail and packages in broad daylight.

This CCTV shows a suspicious man loitering and ringing the doorbell of a home in NSW.

In Queensland, one male is captured on camera late-night during a home burglary attempt.

This footage was captured by Ring Security cameras.Tech expert Trevor Long says we don't need to spend big to protect our homes and loved ones. The Ring floodlight camera will set you back $379.

a man wearing a mask: This late night intruder was caught trying to break into a home. © Provided by Nine Digital Pty Ltd This late night intruder was caught trying to break into a home.

"It needs to be installed by an electrician because it's hard wired into your home. Once it's installed, constantly connected, beautiful motion detection, turning on the lights as well as recording the vision it sees," Mr Long said.

Ring also offers a doorbell ($329) that also works as a camera, plus you can answer the doorbell no matter where you are.

"There's also Nest, it's $279. Requires a power point inside and a simple screw in the roof and it plugs in. It's very easy to install, constantly connected to the internet," Trevor said.

"The next one is Arlo - $499 starter kit. It comes though with a base station that's sitting inside, it has a siren on it so you've got an alarm if you want to set that off."

Each time any of these camera detect motion, Trevor gets an alert on his phone.

a sign on the side of a building: Home security devices don't have to break the bank. © Provided by Nine Digital Pty Ltd Home security devices don't have to break the bank.

"I could be at home, I could be at work or I could be anywhere in the world and I can see what's happening in my home," Mr Long said.

Now let's re-visit the Crouches' burglar. If it wasn't for their cameras, their thief wouldn't have been caught in the act, but Rick and Bev still believe the system has failed them. Their thief is before the drug court rather than the local court for this matter, and Rick and Bev are unhappy about it.

"At first I was upset, cried, everything else, but now at this stage of the game, knowing what he has done and who he is and that he is not going to go to jail, I am really cranky, really really cranky," Mrs Crouch said.

"He's a lowlife, he just doesn't care, as long as he gets what he wants he doesn't care how other people feel."

They don't want the thief to be able to strike again, and they certainly don't want him breaking in to another home.

"I would like to see him go to prison, that's where he deserves to be," Mr Crouch.

"And he moves the camera and he looks straight into the camera, what idiot does that?"


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