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Rare Find 1969 Boss 429 With Only 15,000 Miles!

HOT ROD logo HOT ROD 2018-02-19 Hot Rod Network Staff
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"I got a call from a man in West Virginia. I don't recall his name, but he wanted advice about buying a Boss 302 Mustang," Rick Parker said. Parker and his wife, Jacquie, operate Signature Auto Classics in Gahanna, Ohio, a suburb of Columbus specializing in Ford performance cars of the 1960s and early 1970s. Parker gave the caller some buying tips and then left him with one caveat—if he did not buy the Boss 302, maybe he would give Rick second dibs on the car. That's exactly what happened.

The Boss 302 proved to be too rough for the man in West Virginia, so he gave Rick the phone number of a man named Kenny in Pennsylvania. Kenny had the car at his house and was a neighbor friend of the two brothers that owned the Boss 302. "He did car repairs for them, if that makes sense. That's kind of his connection. He's a good fellow; good on cars. What a nice man, and we started talking cars."

In that conversation, Parker discovered the two brothers, Keith and Brian, also owned a Boss 429 that was stored down the street from Kenny's house, in the back of their fabrication shop in the warehouse. "Kenny took me over to the warehouse, which is like 35,000 square feet, and asked if it was okay to take me back and show me the white Boss 429. It was sitting there with years and years of dirt and dust on it."

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On this visit, Rick Parker bought the project Boss 302. He didn't even touch the Boss 429 because it wasn't for sale. Still, it was impressive to see. "The hood was open. I remember seeing the air cleaner, the snorkel, the smog, the magnesium valve covers. I just thought, what a car!"

Parker kept his patience and did not pester the two brothers to sell, but he made sure to keep in contact and let them know he was very interested in their Boss 429. A year passed, then two, and finally one day Parker spotted a text on his cell phone. The brothers were "ready to do something." Rick drove back to the shop for a hard look, to discover KK1470—a Boss 429 that was early enough to be an S-code, which was sweet news to Rick. He considers the S-code Boss 429 to be the most desirable of the 1969-1970 Boss 429s. "The first 279 were S-codes. They have magnesium valve covers. They have a bigger connecting rod, and then after Ford went through those first 279 cars they realized they didn't need all that on a regular street motor."

The more Parker inspected this '69 Boss 429, the more impressed he was with the car's originality. Somebody had repainted the body 30-35 years ago, but the car was absolutely rust free and complete. Most Boss 429 barn finds, Rick says, are "missing air cleaner, snorkel, carburetor, and distributor." Not this one. Parker was so impressed he said it would be sad to restore this car. Back in Ohio at his shop, Rick said his biggest expense has been soap and water, because his plan is to "clean this car and enjoy it."


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