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Most Efficient Muscle Cars

Motoring Research Logo By John Moroney of Motoring Research | Slide 1 of 15: In the Sixties and early Seventies, a muscle car was often a stripped-down version of a particular model with a stonking great chunk of iron up front. Who cared about carpets with a 426 Hemi under the hood? Today, power can be had in a variety of forms, from Spartan to Lucullan, and there is more of it than ever before. Our homegrown American beasts still roam the highways and dragstrips, and they’ve been joined by wildly potent luxury cars from Germany and England. This list focuses on the traditional American offerings and adds in the most potent sedans from across the pond. They are all V8s. Total power output, both horsepower and torque, is weighed against EPA-estimated fuel economy to rank the vehicles [(horsepower + torque) / combined mpg = score]. Scientific? No, not at all, but what it does do is paint a picture of engineering utopia, a place where cars make 600+ horsepower and can still return decent mileage if driven sanely. Cost to drive 100 miles is based upon average fuel prices for April from the U.S. Energy Information Administration: midgrade, $2.68; premium, $2.91. Follow MSN Autos on Facebook and Twitter

“Back off, man! I’m a scientist!”

In the Sixties and early Seventies, a muscle car was often a stripped-down version of a particular model with a stonking great chunk of iron up front. Who cared about carpets with a 426 Hemi under the hood?

Today, power can be had in a variety of forms, from Spartan to Lucullan, and there is more of it than ever before. Our homegrown American beasts still roam the highways and dragstrips, and they’ve been joined by wildly potent luxury cars from Germany and England.

This list focuses on the traditional American offerings and adds in the most potent sedans from across the pond. They are all V8s. Total power output, both horsepower and torque, is weighed against EPA-estimated fuel economy to rank the vehicles [(horsepower + torque) / combined mpg = score]. Scientific? No, not at all, but what it does do is paint a picture of engineering utopia, a place where cars make 600+ horsepower and can still return decent mileage if driven sanely.

Cost to drive 100 miles is based upon average fuel prices for April from the U.S. Energy Information Administration: midgrade, $2.68; premium, $2.91.

Editor's note: Pricing and economy figures are listed for US models. Click the MSN Research links for Canadian specs and pricing.

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