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15 Coolest Displays at the Friends of Steve McQueen Car and Motorcycle Show

Motor Trend logo Motor Trend 2015-07-07 Megan Stewart

For the past eight years, the Friends of Steve McQueen Car and Motorcycle Show helped raise more than $1 million for the Boys Republic, a private, nonprofit, nonsectarian community for at-risk youth. Car and motorcycle enthusiasts flock to an annual show at the Boys Republic campus in Chino Hills, California, to get a glimpse of some rare and famous vehicles, along with a few hidden gems. Although Porsche and Ford dominated the event, there were an abundance of interesting and unique vehicles, all celebrating Steve McQueen. Check out our list of the 15 coolest displays we saw at this year's show.

1936 Singer Le Mans

1936 Singer Le Mans 1 © Provided by MotorTrend 1936 Singer Le Mans 1 Kicking off our list is the 1936 Singer Le Mans. This model featured a higher-tuned version of the 972cc inline-four found in the 1933 Singer Nine four-door saloon. However, the Le Mans two-door has higher camshafts, a bigger cooled oil sup, and a counterbalanced crankshaft. Power increased to 34 hp, and Singer also added a close-ratio gearbox to the four-speed manual transmission. Other features separating the Le Mans from the larger Nine model are a 14.5-gallon external fuel tank and two spare tires mounted on the rear. It offered a competition-ready appearance; however, it wasn't as successful of a race car as the name would have you believe. Despite not being the best racer, the Singer Le Mans did manage to rake in a number of wins in various other events, including endurance races, trials, and even hill climbs.

1936 Singer Le Mans 2 © Provided by MotorTrend 1936 Singer Le Mans 2

1940 Willys Two-Door Coupe

1940 Willys 2 Door Coupe 1 © Provided by MotorTrend 1940 Willys 2 Door Coupe 1 This 1940 Willys Coupe has been completely customized. The owners rebuilt it back in 2004, adding a 392 Chrysler Hemi engine, giving the small coupe upward of 900 hp. The original Willys Coupe came stock with a 2.4-liter inline-four that produced only 66.5 hp. This coupe now slightly resembles a Volkswagen Beetle, but it’s got hot-rod roots. Thanks to chronic engine failures, as well as a lack of assistance from the automaker and reposition parts, members of the hot rod community bought up two-door Willys cars and replaced the problematic engine. Although some turned out to be weaker than the factory car, others became powerhouses, much like the one at the Steve McQueen show. Thanks to these souped-up cars, finding a stock Willys is virtually impossible.

1940 Willys 2 Door Coupe 2 © Provided by MotorTrend 1940 Willys 2 Door Coupe 2

1957 Chevrolet Cameo AAA Service Patrol Truck

1957 Chevrolet Cameo AAA Truck 1 © Provided by MotorTrend 1957 Chevrolet Cameo AAA Truck 1 Although Jeep used to be AAA Club's official service patrol vehicle, the Auto Club purchased a dozen of the 1957 Chevrolet Cameo pickup trucks to replace them. The model seen here was restored and built to match the original Club Cameo and is one of only 2,240 built. These pickups offered better protection for the driver than the Jeep and were easier to drive on the growing freeway network. GM designer Chuck Jordan, who displayed more carlike styling cues on the pickups, was responsible for the Cameo. The Molded Fiber Glass Company of Ashtabula, Ohio, also the supplier of Corvette bodies, fabricated the fiberglass rear-fender panels, and the club modified the Chevy Cameo to include a tonneau cover on the bed, emergency lights, and a unique color scheme.

1957 Chevrolet Cameo AAA Truck 2 © Provided by MotorTrend 1957 Chevrolet Cameo AAA Truck 2

1965 Cadillac Crown Royale Limousine-Style Hearse, "Silver Spirit Hearse"

1965 Cadillac Crown Royale Limousine Hearse © Provided by MotorTrend 1965 Cadillac Crown Royale Limousine Hearse We weren't expecting to see a luxury hearse from Cadillac. At more than 20 feet long, the Silver Spirit Hearse nearly took up two display spots. The team at Forest Lawn Glendale and the Shop Auto Body Inc. were responsible for the restoration of the hearse. A 340-hp V-8 engine rests under the hood and comes paired with a three-speed turbo-hydramatic automatic transmission, giving this nearly 6,300-pound luxury hearse some serious power. The Silver Spirit also features four-wheel, 12-inch drum-type vacuum-assisted brakes and power-assist steering. This model is just a showpiece for Forest Lawn, but we can imagine being driven to our final resting place in one of these wouldn't be the worst thing.

1965 Cadillac Crown Royale Limousine Hearse 2 © Provided by MotorTrend 1965 Cadillac Crown Royale Limousine Hearse 2

1966 Ford GT350 H Hertz Rent-A-Racer

1966 Ford GT 350H 1 © Provided by MotorTrend 1966 Ford GT 350H 1 Back in the ’60s, Ford and Hertz struck a deal to produce a line of GT350s that would be available for rent. All models would be returned to Ford when their lives as rental cars were finished to be sold as GT350-H models to the public. The majority of the models were a dark green with gold Le Mans stripes and rocker panel stripes, but a few white models with blue stripes were produced. The first models were equipped with a four-speed manual transmission and advertised by Hertz as "Rent-a-Racer" cars. Taking one of these out for a spin would only run you about $17 a day and 17 cents per mile. If only we could go back in time and take one of these to the track.

1966 Ford GT 350H 2 © Provided by MotorTrend 1966 Ford GT 350H 2

1967 Triumph T120 TT Bonneville Special 650

1967 Triumph T120 TT Bonneville Special 650 1 © Provided by MotorTrend 1967 Triumph T120 TT Bonneville Special 650 1 The Friends of Steve McQueen Car and Motorcycle Show wouldn't be complete without some immediately recognizable displays, and we think Evel Knievel's Triumph is one worth mentioning. This is probably one of the most famous motorcycles that he rode, complete with the "Color me Lucky" decal on the gas tank. The daredevil jumped this 1967 Triumph T120 TT Bonneville Special in 1968 over the Caesar's Palace fountains in Las Vegas. The jump was great, but Knievel lost control of the bike when he landed, breaking many bones. Although a loss of handling would seem to deter many people from riding a motorcycle, the popularity of this bike increased despite his injuries.

1967 Triumph T120 TT Bonneville Special 650 2 © Provided by MotorTrend 1967 Triumph T120 TT Bonneville Special 650 2

1968 Ford Mustang, "Optical Illusion"

1969 Ford Mustang Optical Illusion 2 © Provided by MotorTrend 1969 Ford Mustang Optical Illusion 2 We heard this car long before we ever saw it, and once we did, that protruding engine had our attention. This 1969 Ford Mustang, dubbed the Optical Illusion, has been heavily modified. Although most of the display cards have a section for the history of the model, the owner of this car didn’t fill it out, leaving us guessing about everything that's been done to upgrade the ‘Stang. It sounds great and looks even better, but we don't know how the driver managed to find his display area, let alone make it to the event without being involved in an accident or two. That engine is no doubt very difficult to see around.

1969 Ford Mustang Optical Illusion 1 © Provided by MotorTrend 1969 Ford Mustang Optical Illusion 1

1969 Ford Mach 1 Factory Drag Pack 428 Super Cobra Jet

1969 Ford Mach 1 © Provided by MotorTrend 1969 Ford Mach 1 The Mach 1 title was introduced in 1968 for the 1969 model year on the Ford Mustang. This performance-oriented option was available until 1978, but the name remains iconic in the eyes of Mustang fans. Only available on the Sportsroof body style, the Mach 1 package offered a 5.8-liter V-8 engine paired with a three-speed manual. Thanks to its success, Ford had to discontinue the GT model, as it only sold around 5,400 units while the Mach 1 managed nearly 72,500. However, this model was optioned with the 7.0-liter Super Cobra Jet V-8 and available 450 Drag Pack. The one shown at the Friends of Steve McQueen Car and Motorcycle Show is a 1 of 1 according to a Marti Report, which makes this model all the more exciting.

1970 Porsche 914-6

1970 Porsche 914 6 2 © Provided by MotorTrend 1970 Porsche 914 6 2 The looks of the Porsche 914 might not appeal to some, but the style is hard to miss. Created in conjunction with Volkswagen, the 914 was a little more economy than sports car, prompting Porsche to create the 914-6, which swapped out the standard fuel-injected, 80-hp 1.7-liter. The Porsche 914-6 only had a run of two model years due to slow sales that can be attributed to its price point. Although the 914 had a price tag of $3,500, the 914-6 hit $6,000, too close to the economy 911. However, it shows that those who did buy this model truly wanted it. Sales only hit roughly 3,360 units, making this somewhat of a collector's model. The model shown here has been fully restored, and the care taken clearly shows.

1970 Porsche 914 6 1 © Provided by MotorTrend 1970 Porsche 914 6 1

1970 Dodge Monaco, "Bluesmobile" from The Blues Brothers

1974 Dodge Monaco Bluesmobile © Provided by MotorTrend 1974 Dodge Monaco Bluesmobile Films with special cars seem to be a dime a dozen these days, but perhaps one of the most iconic movie vehicles is the Bluesmobile, a 1974 Dodge Monaco from “The Blues Brothers.” The car at the show features the same license plate that pays tribute to the Black Diamond Riders motorcycle club of Toronto, Canada, at 529 Jarvis Street. The Bluesmobile features the "440 Magnum" squad car package, which was offered by Dodge for that model year. In the movie, Elwood Blues, who purchases the car, says to his brother: "It's got a cop motor, a 440-cubic-inch plant. It's got cop tires, cop suspension, cop shocks. It's a model made before catalytic converters, so it'll run good on regular gas." If that isn't a good reason for the purchase, we don't know what is.

1976 Porsche 930 Turbo, the last of Steve McQueen's special-order Porsches

1976 Porsche 930 Turbo 2 © Provided by MotorTrend 1976 Porsche 930 Turbo 2 Perhaps the most important display at the show was Mecum Auctions’ display of Steve McQueen's 1976 Porsche 930 Turbo. This is his last special-order Porsche and will be sold to benefit the Boys Republic. (McQueen was a member of the 1946 class at the community in Chino Hills.) He added some personal touches, including a switch on the dashboard to "kill the rear lights in case he was being chased on Mulholland Drive," to this model, his son, Chad, said when talking with Mecum Auctions. McQueen's 930 Turbo also features a Slate Gray special order exterior color, an early production non-intercooled, 3.0-liter flat-six engine, a black interior, and 8-inch front and 9-inch rear wheels McQueen added himself.

1976 Porsche 930 Turbo 1 © Provided by MotorTrend 1976 Porsche 930 Turbo 1

1981 DeLorean DMC-12 Replica from Back to the Future

1981 Delorean DMC 12 1 © Provided by MotorTrend 1981 Delorean DMC 12 1 The DeLorean was short-lived in terms of a production run, but the name has lived on as the iconic time machine from the “Back to the Future” movies. The DeLorean DMC-12 was the only model ever produced by the now-defunct automaker. Production lasted two years, and during that time, the hood, wheels, and interior were changed. Only 9,000 units were ever produced, and it's estimated that only 6,500 remained after 2007. Although the DeLorean achieved its fame thanks to the movie franchise, the company and its remaining inventory was bought back in 1995 by entrepreneur Stephen Wynne in Humble, Texas. Now, the DeLorean Motor Company assembles new cars from new old stock parts, original equipment manufacturer and reproduction parts using existing VIN plates.

1981 Delorean DMC 12 3 © Provided by MotorTrend 1981 Delorean DMC 12 3 1981 Delorean DMC 12 2 © Provided by MotorTrend 1981 Delorean DMC 12 2

1982 Pontiac Trans Am, "KITT" from Knight Rider

1982 Pontiac Trans AM KITT © Provided by MotorTrend 1982 Pontiac Trans AM KITT The KITT Car, an artificially intelligent electronic computer module in the body of a robotic automobile, grabbed viewers' attention in the 1982 television series, “Knight Rider.” In reality, KITT was a 1982 Pontiac Trans Am with actor William Daniels providing the voice behind the machine. During filming, there were 23 versions of KITT. One was totaled during filming, and all but five were destroyed when the show was canceled. Most of the remaining cars are in the hands of private collectors here in the United States. Back in 2008, the series was rebooted, but the original KITT had been replaced with a 2008 Ford Shelby GT500KR. The new series ran for only one season. We were glad to see the original KITT at the show.

2010 Rossion Q1

2010 Rossion Q1 © Provided by MotorTrend 2010 Rossion Q1 We didn't expect to see a 2010 Rossion Q1 on display. Based off the Noble M400, the Q1 entered development back in 2007 when Rossion acquired the rights to the Noble M400. The U.S. automaker used the strengths of the M400 but added more luxury to the model. Like with all kit cars, the Rossion Q1 is expensive in the sense that the powertrain and chassis were sold separately and had to be assembled. But when you're looking at 450-plus horsepower on a car that's priced just over $100,000, it's not that big of a deal. Rossion holds that you can throw a different engine under the hood than the one it offers, but not many will do so. Rossion now offers the track version of the Q1, the Q1R, which provides consumers with more options. It's not every day that you'll see one of these on the road.

Pee-wee Herman's bike

Pee Wee Herman Beach Cruiser © Provided by MotorTrend Pee Wee Herman Beach Cruiser

It’s not a car or motorcycle, but Pee-wee Herman's retro beach cruiser from the 1985 film “Pee-wee's Big Adventure” is a one-of-a-kind display. It was only last year that the cruiser sold for a remarkable $36,600 on eBay. At the show, a flyer offering a $10,000 reward paid homage to the film. The beach cruiser had all the bells and whistles from the film, including the red and white paint scheme, the tiger head on the handlebars, and the yellow fan above the front tire. This lighthearted display was a good way to finish out the day at the Friends of Steve McQueen Car and Motorcycle Show. We can't wait to see what next year will offer.

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