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9 Strange Car Sounds--And What They Could Mean

Reader's Digest.CA Logo By Emily Chung, readersdigest.ca of Reader's Digest.CA | Slide 1 of 9: While driving, you hear a low-pitched hum. As you accelerate, the noise gets louder--maybe even sounding like an airplane taking off--but after a certain speed the volume is consistent. When you make a turn, the noise gets louder; but if you turn the other way, it disappears.<strong>What it could mean:</strong> This is most likely a wheel bearing noise. It's often mistaken as an engine noise and one way you can tell is to watch your RPM gauge. As you accelerate, the RPM and speed gauges rise. Coast at a set speed, let off the gas pedal and watch the RPM gauge drop. If the noise is still there, it's definitely not coming from the engine.Check out our tips on <a href="http://www.readersdigest.ca/cars/buying-guide/how-avoid-getting-ripped-auto-mechanic/"><strong>How to Avoid Getting Ripped Off by an Auto Mechanic</strong></a>!

Strange car sound: A low-pitched hum

While driving, you hear a low-pitched hum. As you accelerate, the noise gets louder--maybe even sounding like an airplane taking off--but after a certain speed the volume is consistent. When you make a turn, the noise gets louder; but if you turn the other way, it disappears.What it could mean: This is most likely a wheel bearing noise. It's often mistaken as an engine noise and one way you can tell is to watch your RPM gauge. As you accelerate, the RPM and speed gauges rise. Coast at a set speed, let off the gas pedal and watch the RPM gauge drop. If the noise is still there, it's definitely not coming from the engine.Check out our tips on How to Avoid Getting Ripped Off by an Auto Mechanic!
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