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10 Cheapest Turbocharged Cars

U.S. News & World Report - Cars Logo By T. Arthur Corcoran of U.S. News & World Report - Cars | Slide 1 of 12: <p>In popular usage, the word “turbo” has come to mean something like “extra.” You’re about as likely to see the word on a bottle of household cleaner as you are stamped onto a car. And generally speaking, that’s the right idea. Put simply, the point of a <a href="https://cars.usnews.com/cars-trucks/should-i-buy-a-turbocharged-car">turbocharger</a> is to add extra horsepower without increasing engine size. It does this by using exhaust pressure to force extra air into the combustion chamber, creating a bigger boom. Although turbochargers have been around for more than 100 years, it wasn’t until about the last 30 that they came into common usage in passenger cars, most often in sports cars.</p><p>Today, turbochargers are everywhere, from <a href="https://cars.usnews.com/cars-trucks/rankings/compact-cars">compact cars</a> to SUVs to supercars, and everything in between. Auto manufacturers like them because they can make extra power without significantly decreasing fuel economy. As a result, they’ve become especially popular in <a href="https://cars.usnews.com/cars-trucks/rankings/small-cars">small cars</a> and <a href="https://cars.usnews.com/cars-trucks/rankings/compact-suvs">compact SUVs</a>.</p><p>You may be surprised how many inexpensive vehicles are sporting turbocharged engines these days. Click through this slideshow to see all the cheapest ones.</p><p>We cite the U.S. News score of each vehicle on the following slides. Keep in mind that U.S. News scores are updated constantly as new expert reviews and data become available. As a result, the scores that follow might not match those in our <a href="https://cars.usnews.com/cars-trucks/rankings">new car rankings</a>.</p>

The Cheapest Turbo Cars You Can Buy

In popular usage, the word “turbo” has come to mean something like “extra.” You’re about as likely to see the word on a bottle of household cleaner as you are stamped onto a car. And generally speaking, that’s the right idea. Put simply, the point of a turbocharger is to add extra horsepower without increasing engine size. It does this by using exhaust pressure to force extra air into the combustion chamber, creating a bigger boom. Although turbochargers have been around for more than 100 years, it wasn’t until about the last 30 that they came into common usage in passenger cars, most often in sports cars.

Today, turbochargers are everywhere, from compact cars to SUVs to supercars, and everything in between. Auto manufacturers like them because they can make extra power without significantly decreasing fuel economy. As a result, they’ve become especially popular in small cars and compact SUVs.

You may be surprised how many inexpensive vehicles are sporting turbocharged engines these days. Click through this slideshow to see all the cheapest ones.

We cite the U.S. News score of each vehicle on the following slides. Keep in mind that U.S. News scores are updated constantly as new expert reviews and data become available. As a result, the scores that follow might not match those in our new car rankings.

Editor's note: All prices are listed in $US. Click the MSN Research links from Canadian specs and pricing.

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