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11 things people think are terrible for your diet that actually aren't

Business Insider Logo By Erin Brodwin of Business Insider | Slide 1 of 12:  I'm used to the shaming look I get from my peers when I crack open a can of sugar-free Red Bull. The questions - and judgment - never end. "That stuff'll kill you," someone said to me the other day, shaking his head. "So many chemicals!" was what I heard last week. Truth be told, Red Bull (at least the sugar-free kind) isn't all that terrible for you. Besides having only 10 calories and no sugar, it has only 80 milligrams of caffeine, about a third of the amount in a tall Starbucks drip coffee. As far as its other ingredients - namely B vitamins and taurine - go, scientific studies have found both to be safe. But my favorite source of caffeine isn't the only harmless food or drink that gets a bad rap. Here are some of the rest, along with the science behind their safety.

I'm used to the shaming look I get from my peers when I crack open a can of sugar-free Red Bull. The questions - and judgment - never end. "That stuff'll kill you," someone said to me the other day, shaking his head. "So many chemicals!" was what I heard last week.

Truth be told, Red Bull (at least the sugar-free kind) isn't all that terrible for you. Besides having only 10 calories and no sugar, it has only 80 milligrams of caffeine, about a third of the amount in a tall Starbucks drip coffee. As far as its other ingredients - namely B vitamins and taurine - go, scientific studies have found both to be safe.

But my favorite source of caffeine isn't the only harmless food or drink that gets a bad rap. Here are some of the rest, along with the science behind their safety.

© Flickr/Danielle Scott

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