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10 Things You Should Never Do Before a Doctor Appointment—and 4 Things You Should

Reader's Digest Canada Logo By Tina Donvito, thehealthy.com of Reader's Digest Canada | Slide 1 of 14: Avoid anything that alters your triglycerides (one of the four components measured in a cholesterol profile), since that could lead to needlessly worrying results. "The precaution to abstain 24 hours prior to a cholesterol test is based on the potential increase in triglycerides that could result soon after drinking alcohol," says Joon Sup Lee, MD, chief of cardiology at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and co-director of the UPMC Heart and Vascular Institute. You should also avoid sweets, high-fat foods, and generally overeating before the test. "All of these in large quantities can affect the triglycerides in the short term," Dr. Lee says. "Since we want the result of the cholesterol exam to reflect what your body is doing in the long term, it is best to avoid these short-term fluctuations." Interestingly, Dr. Lee says regularly consuming one or two alcoholic drinks per day can actually have a mild beneficial effect on cholesterol levels. So go ahead and imbibe moderately when you're not about to take the test.

Don't drink alcohol before a cholesterol test

Avoid anything that alters your triglycerides (one of the four components measured in a cholesterol profile), since that could lead to needlessly worrying results. "The precaution to abstain 24 hours prior to a cholesterol test is based on the potential increase in triglycerides that could result soon after drinking alcohol," says Joon Sup Lee, MD, chief of cardiology at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and co-director of the UPMC Heart and Vascular Institute. You should also avoid sweets, high-fat foods, and generally overeating before the test. "All of these in large quantities can affect the triglycerides in the short term," Dr. Lee says. "Since we want the result of the cholesterol exam to reflect what your body is doing in the long term, it is best to avoid these short-term fluctuations." Interestingly, Dr. Lee says regularly consuming one or two alcoholic drinks per day can actually have a mild beneficial effect on cholesterol levels. So go ahead and imbibe moderately when you're not about to take the test.

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