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11 Top Tricks from Therapists on How to Deal with Anxiety

Reader's Digest.CA Logo By Charlotte Hilton Andersen of Reader's Digest.CA | Slide 1 of 11: It's the mental health vicious cycle: Exercise has been proven in study after study as one of the best remedies for anxiety and depression, yet getting sweaty is often the last thing anxious people feel like doing. Even worse, sometimes just the thought of going to a gym full of people in spandex is enough to trigger an anxiety attack. (Having a full-blown panic attack and need to know how to deal with anxiety? Use these <a href='https://www.rd.com/health/conditions/manage-anxiety-and-panic-disorder/1'>tips for dealing with an anxiety attack</a> in the moment.) Enter yoga. You can do it in the privacy of your own home and it's gentle enough that most people can do it. 'The endorphins that exercise helps to release are crucial for people with anxiety as they often have a small 'window of tolerance,' meaning stressors that seem small to others feel very big to them,' says <a href='http://www.compassionatecounselingstl.com'>Kelsey Torgerson</a>, MSW, a licensed clinical social worker and anxiety and anger management specialist in St. Louis, adding that she personally does yoga four times a week. 'Yoga increases that window of tolerance and builds stress management skills.'

Deal with it in down dog

It's the mental health vicious cycle: Exercise has been proven in study after study as one of the best remedies for anxiety and depression, yet getting sweaty is often the last thing anxious people feel like doing. Even worse, sometimes just the thought of going to a gym full of people in spandex is enough to trigger an anxiety attack. (Having a full-blown panic attack and need to know how to deal with anxiety? Use these tips for dealing with an anxiety attack in the moment.) Enter yoga. You can do it in the privacy of your own home and it's gentle enough that most people can do it. 'The endorphins that exercise helps to release are crucial for people with anxiety as they often have a small 'window of tolerance,' meaning stressors that seem small to others feel very big to them,' says Kelsey Torgerson, MSW, a licensed clinical social worker and anxiety and anger management specialist in St. Louis, adding that she personally does yoga four times a week. 'Yoga increases that window of tolerance and builds stress management skills.'
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