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28 Medical Words Never, Ever to Confuse

Reader's Digest.CA Logo By Marissa Laliberte of Reader's Digest.CA | Slide 1 of 28: Both sound like they’re meant for an immediate medical condition, but they aren’t for the same types of emergencies. Urgent care centers are designed for similar care to what you’d get from your primary care doctor. If you have a fever, sore throat, vomit, or a shallow cut and can’t make an appointment with your regular physician, head to urgent care. The ER should be reserved for conditions that need quick or advanced treatments that you can only get at a hospital. Difficulty breathing, severe pain in the abdomen or chest, eye or head injuries, and cuts deep enough for stitches should all be treated in an emergency room. These are the secrets urgent care centers won't tell you.

What's the difference between an ER visit and urgent care?

Both sound like they’re meant for an immediate medical condition, but they aren’t for the same types of emergencies. Urgent care centers are designed for similar care to what you’d get from your primary care doctor. If you have a fever, sore throat, vomit, or a shallow cut and can’t make an appointment with your regular physician, head to urgent care. The ER should be reserved for conditions that need quick or advanced treatments that you can only get at a hospital. Difficulty breathing, severe pain in the abdomen or chest, eye or head injuries, and cuts deep enough for stitches should all be treated in an emergency room. These are the secrets urgent care centers won't tell you.

© Emma Kapotes/Rd.com, iStock

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