You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

5 Things That Happened When I Used A Himalayan Salt Lamp For A Month

Rodale's Organic Life Logo By Allison Young of Rodale's Organic Life | Slide 1 of 5: <p>There’s a reason you feel good around waterfalls. Moving water emits a ton of negative ions (translation: oxygen ions with an extra electron)—particles dubbed “nature’s anti-depressant” <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20381162">scientifically linked to a boosted mood</a> in people with winter depression. In short, negative ions create positive vibes. And the makers of salt lamps claim that just being near these supposed negative ion-emitters means you’re breathing in a good mood. </p><p>Alas, I did not get an extra hit of happiness—not even a 5% increase in uplifting energy—and believe me, I wanted to. But maybe I was missing something; maybe the changes in me were as microscopic as the invisible ions. So I emailed <a href="http://profiles.columbiapsychiatry.org/profile/mterman">Michael Terman</a> PhD, director of the Center for Light Treatment and Biological Rhythms at Columbia University Medical Center who has studied the link between SAD and negative ions. But his response only reinforced my findings: “Commercial promotion of salt lamps, claiming mood enhancement via ionized oxygen, is pure hype.” Not much room for argument there. </p>

It Did Not Give Me A Mood Boost

There’s a reason you feel good around waterfalls. Moving water emits a ton of negative ions (translation: oxygen ions with an extra electron)—particles dubbed “nature’s anti-depressant” scientifically linked to a boosted mood in people with winter depression. In short, negative ions create positive vibes. And the makers of salt lamps claim that just being near these supposed negative ion-emitters means you’re breathing in a good mood.

Alas, I did not get an extra hit of happiness—not even a 5% increase in uplifting energy—and believe me, I wanted to. But maybe I was missing something; maybe the changes in me were as microscopic as the invisible ions. So I emailed Michael Terman PhD, director of the Center for Light Treatment and Biological Rhythms at Columbia University Medical Center who has studied the link between SAD and negative ions. But his response only reinforced my findings: “Commercial promotion of salt lamps, claiming mood enhancement via ionized oxygen, is pure hype.” Not much room for argument there.

© Photograph by phototechno/ Getty

More From Rodale's Organic Life

Rodale's Organic Life
Rodale's Organic Life
image beaconimage beaconimage beacon