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Freed journalist, bullied woman on speakers’ list for TEDxVancouver

The Province logo The Province 2015-11-03 staff reporter
Kaitlyn Bristowe, a Vancouver dance instructor, rose to fame when she finished third in ABC’s 19th season of The Bachelor. — The Associated Press files Freed journalist and bullied Bachelorette on speakers’ list for TEDxVancouver

The latest two speakers added to the TEDxVancouver lineup will address the conference after becoming unwilling experts on their topics.

Mohamed Fahmy, an Egyptian-Canadian journalist and author, became famous in Canada after being jailed for 400 days while serving as Al-Jazeera’s bureau chief in Egypt.

Arrested in late December, 2013, and accused of associating with terrorists, a charge widely condemned, he was pardoned and released this September.

Fahmy now works as a journalist in residence at UBC.

Kaitlyn Bristowe, a Vancouver dance instructor, rose to fame when she finished third in ABC’s 19th season of The Bachelor.

She went on to host Season 11 of The Bachelorette and wound up the target of vicious social-media bullying.

Bristowe will discuss the ongoing popularity of TV’s reality genre and how to overcome adversity in the public eye.

The theme of this year’s TEDxVancouver, Nov. 14 at Rogers Arena, is “conceptions and realities of individual identification.”

Among the other speakers are UBC’s Marina Adshade, known for her popular undergraduate course the Economics of Sex and Love and her blog Dollars and Sex, and Dr. Lara Boyd, a neurobiologist; SFU’s Janet Moore and Duane Elverum, experts in sustainable community development and co-founders of CityStudio Vancouver; Dan Sutton, managing director of medicinal marijuana producers Tantalus Labs; and Chin Injeti, co-founder of the musical group Bass is Base.

And Jackie Huba, an online marketing expert, said she’ll be giving a different speech than she normally gives.

“I’ll be speaking about how the process that drag queens use to transfer into bold female personas for the stage also works to shape the personas we ‘perform’ every day,” Huba wrote on her website.

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