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The AP Interview: Marcos' Philippines on world stage

SHOTLIST: RESTRICTION SUMMARY: ASSOCIATED PRESSNew York - 24 September 20221. Various of Ferdinand Marcos Jr., President of the Philippines, entering, greeting reporter2. SOUNDBITE (English) Ferdinand Marcos, Jr., President of the Philippines++PARTIALLY COVERED++"The purpose, really, that I have brought to this visit here in New York in the peripheries of the U.N. General Assembly, has been to try to reintroduce the Philippines to our American friends, both in the private sector and in the public sector."ASSOCIATED PRESSNew York - 22 September 20223. STILL of Marcos meeting with U.S. President Joe BidenASSOCIATED PRESSNew York - 19 September 20224. STILL of Marcos at New York Stock ExchangeASSOCIATED PRESSNew York - 24 September 20225. SOUNDBITE (English) Ferdinand Marcos, Jr., President of the Philippines"We do not want to return to whatever it is we were doing pre-pandemic. We want to be able to be involved and be part, a vital part, of the new global economy."ASSOCIATED PRESSARCHIVE: Manila - 10 May 20226. Wide of counting in presidential election7. Tight of screen showing Marcos votesTEXT ON SCREEN: "Elected this year, Marcos is drawing distinctions between himself and his voluble predecessor, Rodrigo Duterte."ASSOCIATED PRESSARCHIVE: Manila - 22 July 20198. Wide of Duterte in congress hall9. Wide of anti-Duterte protestsTEXT ON SCREEN: "The former president alienated many international partners with his violent approach to fighting drug trafficking."ASSOCIATED PRESSNew York - 24 September 202210. SOUNDBITE (English) Ted Anthony, Associated Press reporter, and Ferdinand Marcos, Jr., President of the Philippines++PARTIALLY COVERED++ANTHONY: "I want to talk for a moment about the war on drugs in the Philippines. The methods used in it during Mr. Duterte. His administration were controversial, to say the least, internally and externally. And I'm interested in -- can you give a sense of what your approach to that is and how, if it differs from Mr. Duterte's?"MARCOS: "Well, it does in the sense that we have tried to learn from the lessons that we saw in the experience of President Duterte and his war on drugs. And I think one of the main lessons is that his emphasis was on enforcement. And, you know, in our analysis, enforcement only gets you so far."11. SOUNDBITE (English) Ted Anthony, Associated Press reporter and Ferdinand Marcos, Jr., President of the PhilippinesANTHONY: "Do you think that President Duterte went too far in the way he approached it?"MARCOS: "Well, he that was his emphasis. His people went too far sometimes. And we have seen many cases where policemen or other operatives, somewere, some just shady characters that we didn't quite know where they came from and who they were working for. But now we've gone after them. And there are many, many instances where we can show that those who have been found guilty, those who have been convicted or been detained, are now in jail."12. SOUNDBITE (English) Ted Anthony, Associated Press reporter AND Ferdinand Marcos, Jr., President of the PhilippinesANTHONY: "You said -- this is kind of related. You've stated pretty emphatically that the Philippines should not return to the International Criminal Court, and I'd like to hear a little bit about why you feel that way. Is it related to the previous administration's stance? What is the rationale behind that approach?"MARCOS: "We have a judiciary. It's not perfect. We have enforcement. We have the courts are functioning. And I do not understand why we need an outside adjudicator to tell us how to investigate, who to investigate, how to go about it. We have our own system and it's functioning. So that immediately brings me to questions of jurisdiction and sovereignty."STORYLINE:Looking to "reintroduce the Philippines" to the world, new President Ferdinand Marcos Jr. has ambitious plans for his nation on the international stage and at home — if, that is, the twin specters of pandemic and climate change can be overcome or at least managed.And if he can surmount the legacies of two people: his predecessor, and his father.He also wants to strengthen ties with both the United States and China — a delicate balancing act for the Southeast Asian nation — and, like many of his fellow leaders at the United Nations this week, called on the countries that have caused global warming to help less wealthy nations counteract its effects.Marcos, swept into office this spring, is already drawing distinctions both subtle and obvious between himself and his voluble predecessor, Rodrigo Duterte, who alienated many international partners with his violent approach to fighting drug trafficking and the coarse rhetoric he used to galvanize supporters.Asked if Duterte went too far with his lethal drug crackdown, Marcos redirected the criticism toward those who carried out the plan."His people went too far sometimes," Marcos told The Associated Press on Friday. "We have seen many cases where policemen, other operatives, some were just shady characters that we didn't quite know where they came from and who they were working for. But now we've gone after them."Marcos, 65, sat for a wide-ranging interview in New York on the sidelines of the U.N. General Assembly's annual leaders' meeting. Three months into his administration, he seemed energetic and enthusiastic — and eager to project his vision for the nation beyond its borders.On Thursday, he met with U.S. President Joe Biden in a bid to strengthen the sometimes complicated ties that have ebbed and flowed between the two nations since the Philippines spent four decades as an American colony in the early 20th century.When it comes to his predecessor, Marcos treads a nuanced political line as well. Distinguishing himself from Duterte's in-your-face rule can benefit him at home and internationally, but Duterte's popularity helped catapult him into office, and the former president's daughter Sara is Marcos' vice president. The extrajudicial killings associated with Duterte's yearslong crackdown provoked calls that his administration should be investigated from the outside, and he vowed not to rejoin the International Criminal Court — a precept that Marcos agrees with. After all, Marcos asked, why should a country with a functioning legal system be judged from elsewhere? "We have a judiciary. It's not perfect," he said. "I do not understand why we need an outside adjudicator to tell us how to investigate, who to investigate, how to go about it."AP Video shot by Robert Bumsted and David MartinProduced by Robert Bumsted===========================================================Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: info@aparchive.com(ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory.
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