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Warm waters turbocharge Hurricane Ian

SHOT LIST: RESTRICTION SUMMARY: PART MUST CREDIT NASAASSOCIATED PRESSWest Bay Grand Cayman, Cayman Islands - 26 September 20221. Various Heavy rains on residential neighborhoodASSOCIATED PRESS Highlands Ranch, Colorado – 27 September 20222. SOUNDBITE (English) Phil Klotzbach, Colorado State University hurricane researcher:++PARTIALLY COVERED++"We have seen with Hurricane Ian rapid intensification, which is a storm that intensifies by at least 35 miles per hour in a 24-hour period."ASSOCIATED PRESSWest Bay Grand Cayman, Cayman Islands – 26 September 20223. Heavy rains on residential neighborhoodASSOCIATED PRESSTroy, New York – 27 September 20224. SOUNDBITE (English) Kristen Corbosiero, University of Albany hurricane scientist:++PARTIALLY COVERED++"In the Atlantic Basin, yes, we are definitely seeing an increase in rapid intensification."ASSOCIATED PRESSTroy, New York – 27 September 20226. SOUNDBITE (English) Kristen Corbosiero, University of Albany hurricane scientist:++PARTIALLY COVERED++ "The warmer sea surface temperatures are probably the number one reason. With a warming atmosphere, it can hold more water vapor. If the atmosphere is more moist, that is good for the thunderstorms that make up the tropical storm."ASSOCIATED PRESSHavana – 27 September 20227. Empty road with rain, windANNOTATION: While climate change doesn't create hurricanes, scientists say that a warming world means an increase in rapidly intensifying storms.NASA – MUST CREDIT NASAInternational Space Station – 26 September 20228. Various of Hurricane Ian during space station flyover ++MUTE++ANNOTATION: Sea level rise, increased moisture, and possibly a slower pace are other ways climate change is affecting storms.ASSOCIATED PRESSTroy, New York – 27 September 20229. SOUNDBITE (English) Kristen Corbosiero, University of Albany hurricane scientist:++PARTIALLY COVERED++"It's fantastic that the governor and state officials have been trying to get people to evacuate because Tampa has not seen a major storm in a very long time. And there's been a tremendous amount of growth in residents and buildings along the coast."ASSOCIATED PRESSTampa, Florida - 27 September 202210. Various of people boarding up homeANNOTATION: It's been more than a century since a major storm like Hurricane Ian has struck the Tampa Bay area.STORYLINE:Hurricane Ian is quickly gaining monstrous strength as it moves over oceans partly heated up by climate change.As the world warms, this turbocharging of storms is likely to become even more frequent, scientists say.After getting 67% stronger in less than 22 hours from Monday to Tuesday, Ian is bearing down on Florida as a likely Category 4 hurricane that threatens to deliver a nightmare storm-surge to Tampa Bay.Ian's so-called rapid intensification occurred after it traveled over Caribbean waters that are about 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit (1 degree Celsius) warmer than normal, largely because of climate change.Although numerous factors contribute to the speed at which a storm intensifies, "the warmer sea surface temperatures are probably the number one reason," said Kristen Corbosiero, hurricane scientist at the University of Albany.Sea level rise, increased moisture, and possibly a slower pace are other ways climate change is affecting storms.The National Hurricane Center defines rapidly intensifying storms as those that gain at least 35 mph in wind speed in less than 24 hours. Their often unpredictable nature can cause major problems for coastal residents, emergency planners and forecasters. In Ian's case, the meteorological conditions were so obvious that forecasters were warning about it days in advance.It's been more than a century since a major storm like Hurricane Ian has struck the Tampa Bay area.Forecasters said the surge of ocean water could reach 10 feet (3 meters) if it peaks at high tide. Rainfall near the area of landfall could top 16 inches (41 centimeters).----Produced by: Brittany Peterson----Associated Press climate and environmental coverage receives support from several private foundations. The AP is solely responsible for all content.===========================================================Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: info@aparchive.com(ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory.

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