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Why are there bigger and more frequent hurricanes?

Espresso Logo By Ruby Pratka of Espresso | Slide 1 of 11: <p><strong>2017</strong> has been a record-breaking year for <strong>hurricanes</strong>. <a href="https://qz.com/1095443/tropical-storm-nate-every-hurricane-and-tropical-storm-that-has-hit-the-atlantic-in-2017/">For the first time</a> in more than a century, eight consecutive <strong>tropical storms</strong> developed into hurricanes, and “for the first time in recorded history, three hurricanes in the Atlantic simultaneously threatened land,” according to Quartz. <strong>Harvey</strong>, <strong>Irma</strong>, <strong>Jose</strong>, and <strong>Maria</strong> swept through the <strong>Caribbean</strong> and different parts of the United States in quick succession. The combined known death toll of the four storms is over 200, and damage from Harvey alone amounts to billions of dollars. Irma, which swirled over the Caribbean, <strong>Florida</strong>, and <strong>Georgia</strong> from August 26 to September 12, was the strongest storm ever recorded in the Atlantic outside the <strong>Gulf of Mexico</strong> or Caribbean Sea. There have already been 14 named tropical storms this year, including eight hurricanes. By the time hurricane season ends in November, it is likely that 2017 will become the <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/19/us/hurricanes-irma-harvey-maria.html">second most active season on record</a>, after the record-breaking 2005 season. Why has this year brought us bigger and more frequent hurricanes? How exceptional is the 2017 hurricane season? Read on to find out.</p>

Why are there bigger and more frequent hurricanes?

2017 has been a record-breaking year for hurricanes. For the first time in more than a century, eight consecutive tropical storms developed into hurricanes, and “for the first time in recorded history, three hurricanes in the Atlantic simultaneously threatened land,” according to Quartz. Harvey, Irma, Jose, and Maria swept through the Caribbean and different parts of the United States in quick succession. The combined known death toll of the four storms is over 200, and damage from Harvey alone amounts to billions of dollars. Irma, which swirled over the Caribbean, Florida, and Georgia from August 26 to September 12, was the strongest storm ever recorded in the Atlantic outside the Gulf of Mexico or Caribbean Sea. There have already been 14 named tropical storms this year, including eight hurricanes. By the time hurricane season ends in November, it is likely that 2017 will become the second most active season on record, after the record-breaking 2005 season. Why has this year brought us bigger and more frequent hurricanes? How exceptional is the 2017 hurricane season? Read on to find out.

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