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10 weird hidden Italian treasures

Classic & Sports Car Logo By Ronan Glon of Classic & Sports Car | Slide 2 of 21: Fiat began the 100 project in the early 1950s to create a replacement for the original 500, which earned the nickname ‘Topolino’ shortly after its introduction in 1936. It was a car that sold reasonably well in Italy but that was undeniably showing its age, even by post-WW2 standards. Engineers knew they couldn’t make its replacement front-engined and rear-wheel drive due to weight constraints, so they put the engine and the transmission in the back after briefly experimenting with front-wheel drive. Built in 1951, this test mule accurately previewed the 600 that put millions of Italians on wheels after its release in 1955. Its overall silhouette changed little as it transitioned into a production model.

1. Fiat 100 prototype (1951)

Fiat began the 100 project in the early 1950s to create a replacement for the original 500, which earned the nickname ‘Topolino’ shortly after its introduction in 1936.

It was a car that sold reasonably well in Italy but that was undeniably showing its age, even by post-WW2 standards.

Engineers knew they couldn’t make its replacement front-engined and rear-wheel drive due to weight constraints, so they put the engine and the transmission in the back after briefly experimenting with front-wheel drive.

Built in 1951, this test mule accurately previewed the 600 that put millions of Italians on wheels after its release in 1955. Its overall silhouette changed little as it transitioned into a production model.

© Ronan Glon
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