You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

1000mph speed record attempt axed

Autocar Logo By Autocar of Autocar | Slide 1 of 26: That was the day we found out that the dreams of the British Bloodhound SSC project (pictured) to become the world's first car to surpass 1000mph had crumbled. The effort was to use the turbojet engine from a jet fighter aircraft as well as a rocket to produce a staggering 133,000bhp. It was due to attempt a run to 500mph in 2019, and a 1000mph mission in 2020, both of which were to take place on the Hakskeen Pan in South Africa. Unfortunately the project first ran into serious money problems in October. An administrator was brought in to try and find funding - £5 million (US$6.5m) for the 500mph run under jet power, around £15m (US$19.5m) to achieve 800mph and break the existing record, and around £25m (US$32.5m) to reach its ultimate goal of lifting the record to 1000mph.  On December 7 he called time on his efforts, and it now looks like the project will close."Despite overwhelming public support, and engagement with a wide range of potential and credible investors, it has not been possible to secure a purchaser for the business and assets," Sheridan told the BBC. "We will now work with the key stakeholders to return the third-party equipment and then sell the remaining assets of the company to maximise the return for creditors."But Bloodhound is just the latest in a long list of would-be land speed record vehicles, built with the sole purpose of taking the ultimate Earth-based speed crown. Here we chart mankind’s quest to be the fastest on earth:

Friday December 7 was a sad day for anyone who cares about raw speed.

That was the day we found out that the dreams of the British Bloodhound SSC project (pictured) to become the world's first car to surpass 1000mph had crumbled. The effort was to use the turbojet engine from a jet fighter aircraft as well as a rocket to produce a staggering 133,000bhp. It was due to attempt a run to 500mph in 2019, and a 1000mph mission in 2020, both of which were to take place on the Hakskeen Pan in South Africa. Unfortunately the project first ran into serious money problems in October. 

An administrator was brought in to try and find funding - £5 million (US$6.5m) for the 500mph run under jet power, around £15m (US$19.5m) to achieve 800mph and break the existing record, and around £25m (US$32.5m) to reach its ultimate goal of lifting the record to 1000mph.  On December 7 he called time on his efforts, and it now looks like the project will close.

"Despite overwhelming public support, and engagement with a wide range of potential and credible investors, it has not been possible to secure a purchaser for the business and assets," Sheridan told the BBC. "We will now work with the key stakeholders to return the third-party equipment and then sell the remaining assets of the company to maximise the return for creditors."

But Bloodhound is just the latest in a long list of would-be land speed record vehicles, built with the sole purpose of taking the ultimate Earth-based speed crown. Here we chart mankind’s quest to be the fastest on earth:

© Bloodhound SSC

MORE FROM AUTOCAR

image beaconimage beaconimage beacon