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Irish government vows to ban the sale of new petrol and diesel cars in 2030 - a decade earlier than Britain

Daily Mail logo Daily Mail 19/06/2019 Rob Hull For Thisismoney.co.uk
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The Irish government has proposed to ban the sale of new petrol and diesel vehicles in 2030 - 10 years earlier than plans laid out for Britain.

The ban was part of a 180-point strategy outlined by the Irish government in its Climate Action Plan that was published earlier this week.

The hope is that in 11 years' time there will be close to one million electric vehicles on Irish roads and a nationwide charging infrastructure to cope with demand.

a close up of a car: Petrol and diesel ban: Irish ministers want the sale of new combustion engined cars to end in the country in 2030 - a full decade before Britain plans the same restriction © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Petrol and diesel ban: Irish ministers want the sale of new combustion engined cars to end in the country in 2030 - a full decade before Britain plans the same restriction

The strategy is part of wider plans to to reduce emission and protect the environment and included the same deadline for a ban on non-recyclable plastics.

Environment minister Richard Bruton said the restriction on sale of vehicles with combustion engines was a vital move for the country, which he described as being 'way off course' in its attempts to meet strict emissions targets set out by the EU.


Bruton added that Ireland is currently 85 per cent dependent on fossil fuels and as a result CO2 emissions have been 'rising rapidly' in recent years - a trend he wants to see reversed. 

He arrived at the launch of the plan in Grangegorman, north Dublin, on a hybrid electric bus, accompanied by Taoiseach (Irish Prime Minister) Leo Varadkar and several other members of the cabinet.


He said the plan identified how the country would achieve its 2030 targets for carbon emissions, and put the country 'on a trajectory to achieve net zero carbon emissions by 2050'.

Ministers hope that by the time the ban on the sale of new petrol and diesel vehicles is introduced there will be 950,000 zero-emissions cars on the road.

a group of people standing in front of a bus: Taoiseach Leo Varadkar (left) and Minister Richard Bruton (centre) arrive on a Hybrid Electirc bus at TU Dublin Grangegorman campus for the publication of the governments Climate Action Plan to Tackle Climate Breakdown on Monday © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Taoiseach Leo Varadkar (left) and Minister Richard Bruton (centre) arrive on a Hybrid Electirc bus at TU Dublin Grangegorman campus for the publication of the governments Climate Action Plan to Tackle Climate Breakdown on Monday

And to cope with the onset of more plug-in models, the Government said it will invest in a robust 'nationwide' charging network. 

By 2025, it hopes to have at least one charge point installed at an non-residential building that has more than 10 parking spaces allocated to it.

Other changes proposed include the end of the National Car Test certificates from 2045 onwards.

a person wearing a suit and tie: Bruton said the country was 'way off course' in its attempts to meet strict emissions targets set out by the EU © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Bruton said the country was 'way off course' in its attempts to meet strict emissions targets set out by the EU

This is the roadworthiness test similar to the MOT in Britain.

Like the MOT, it's a compulsory vehicle inspection that's carried out annually. However, it is only subject to vehicles that are more than 10 years old - not three years. 

Opposition parties said Bruton's Climate Action Plan lacked detail, similar to criticisms aimed at the Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs' Clean Air Strategy in 2017 - outlined by Michael Gove and Chris Grayling - confirming plans to ban the sale of petrol and diesel cars in Britain from 2040.

The Green Party and Sinn Féin added that the plan failed to focus on public transport, which is a significant polluter.  

a man wearing a suit and tie walking down the street: Ministers also proposed the end the National Car Test (NCT) certificates from 2045 onwards © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Ministers also proposed the end the National Car Test (NCT) certificates from 2045 onwards

Madrid to suspend car restrictions in city centre from 1 July 

Madrid´s new municipal government plans to suspend some anti-car emissions policies in the city centre, drawing a warning from the European Commission that Spain might be sanctioned if it fails to meet air quality standards.

The municipality, controlled by the conservative People's Party (PP), said on Monday that from 1 July it would suspend fines on cars entering a currently restricted area of around five square kilometres (two square miles), while it conducts a review of the policy.

The PP says the current restrictions have been too disruptive.

Gallery: The electric cars that paved the way (Auto Car)

The policy, known as 'Madrid central', started last November when the city's then far-left government banned most petrol and diesel cars from its centre as a way to tackle high levels of nitrogen dioxide in Madrid, which had been in violation of European regulations since 2010.

Asked about the municipality's roll-back plans, EU Climate chief Miguel Arias Canete said on Tuesday that it would be analysed as part of Spain's overall programmes on air quality to see whether they are aligned with EU policy.

Canete - who before becoming a commissioner served as a minister in a Spanish PP government - said the European Commission had issued warnings in the past to Spanish cities that did not comply with air-quality limits, demanding corrections and launching potential violation procedures.

Spain's acting Socialist government, which has put a focus on environmental policies, has criticised the suspension of Madrid's restrictions.  

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