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Christian Bale looks unrecognisable as he shaves head and piles on the pounds for Dick Cheney role

Evening Standard logo Evening Standard 13/11/2017 Emma Powell
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Christian Bale has proved his dedication to his craft after stepping out with a completely new appearance.

The US actor, 43, looked unrecognisable with a fuller frame and a bald head at the photocall for his latest film, Hostiles.

Bale has been piling on the pounds and shaved off his hair and beard to play former vice president Dick Cheney in the forthcoming biopic, Backseat.

He opened up about the hefty weight gain at the Toronto International Film Festival earlier this year, telling reporters: “I’ve just been eating a lot of pies.”

Christian Bale and Sibi Blazic attend the Telluride Film Festival 2017 on September 3, 2017 in Telluride, Colorado. © Vivien Killilea/Getty Images Christian Bale and Sibi Blazic attend the Telluride Film Festival 2017 on September 3, 2017 in Telluride, Colorado.

Directed by Adam McKay, Backseat will follow Cheney’s rise to becoming the most powerful Vice President in American history. He stars alongside Amy Adams as Lynne Cheney and Sam Rockwell as George W. Bush.

Bale is no stranger to transforming dramatically for a role.

In 2004’s The Machinist he lost four and half stones to play an emaciated insomniac, admitting to eating one apple and a can of tuna a day.

He later piled on muscle to play Batman in The Dark Knight movies and stocked up on doughnuts in preparation for his role in American Hustle.

Before: Christian Bale with a thinner frame (Valerie Macon/AFP/Getty) © Provided by Evening Standard Limited Before: Christian Bale with a thinner frame (Valerie Macon/AFP/Getty)

Speaking about his fluctuating weight, he told OTRC: “It’s easy to start with … you’re just sitting on your butt and you’re eating lots of doughnuts and eating bread and everything like that.

“But you do it for two months and your body starts to rebel against you, it’s just saying, ‘No, please,’ and your back is aching and there’s also some problems with that.”

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