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Top chef reveals the secrets to cooking dried pasta perfectly every time - and exactly how much water you need to put in the pot

Daily Mail logo Daily Mail 20/03/2019 Matilda Rudd For Daily Mail Australia

Top view of a rustic wooden table filled with a large Italian pasta variety. The types of pasta included are spaghetti, orecchiette, conchiglie, rigatoni, fusilli, penne and tagliatelle. Predominant colors are yellow and brown. DSRL studio photo taken with Canon EOS 5D Mk II and Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM © Getty Top view of a rustic wooden table filled with a large Italian pasta variety. The types of pasta included are spaghetti, orecchiette, conchiglie, rigatoni, fusilli, penne and tagliatelle. Predominant colors are yellow and brown. DSRL studio photo taken with Canon EOS 5D Mk II and Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM An executive chef has revealed that putting oil in your pasta water is a 'waste of time' and you need one litre of water for every 100 grams of dry pasta if you want it to be perfectly cooked.

The handy home cook information was shared by Barilla Australia's Andrea Tranchero who has worked in Michelin starred restaurants around the world.

He spoke to Good Food about how to make the perfect pasta and why the boiling water is one of the most important parts.

Firstly, Mr Tranchero said that the water must be salted 'very well' with seven grams of rock salt per litre of water.

It's a common misconception that oil should be added at this stage as well, but the chef advises against it. 

Daily Mail © Daily Mail Daily Mail 'Oil stays on top of the water, and the pasta sinks, so really it gets tipped out with the water,' he told the publication.

Instead focus on having on litre of water for every 100 grams of dry pasta, that way there is enough space in the large saucepan for the delicious carbs to 'dance freely around the pot'.

'Bring the water to the boil then add rock salt. Once you've dropped your pasta into the water you need to stir it then put a timer on,' he said.

'Make sure you regularly stir the pasta and remember to reserve a ladle of cooking water before draining the pasta so you can add it to your sauce if needed.'

© Getty If you follow the timing on the back of the pasta packet down to the second your spaghetti should be al dente - slightly firm to bite into.

He also recommends not rinsing your pasta because it washes away the starch that makes your 'sauce silky'.

As a general rule, good quality pasta will keep the water clear and there won't be foam on the top.  

Gallery: Pasta hacks and tips for you to try {Photos]

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