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Get your GBBO on with our 5 best food processors

Cosmopolitan (UK) Logo By Hannah Mendelsohn of Cosmopolitan (UK) | Slide 1 of 6: It’s GBBO season, so if you’re ready to elevate your baking skills from lockdown banana bread to plaited loaf, there’s one gadget that will make all the difference. Enter the multi-tasking food processor.This ace appliance chops and slices and kneads. Some even blend – it’s like having your own sous chef to do the heavy lifting. Simply set it to work and get on with the next step of the recipe – or check back in on Tiktok, we ain’t judgin’. What food processor should I buy?Predictably, these do-it-all machines don’t usually come cheap, but our dedicated testing team has done what they do best and found five trusty food processors that won’t leave you weeping into your third consecutive baked bean tea. Ready to earn that Hollywood handshake? Here are tried and tested faves for less than £100:Best budget food processor: Morphy Richards Prepstar Food Processor 401012Best food processor under £100: Bosch MCM3501MGBBest compact food processor: Russell Hobbs 25920 Go Create Food ProcessorBest food processor for baking: VonShef Food ProcessorBest food processor for blending: Russell Hobbs Desire 24732What’s the difference between a food processor and a blender?While some food processors come with a jug blender attachment, this isn’t the case for all of them, so it’s worth thinking about which machine would be most helpful in your kitchen. Blenders have smoothies and soups nailed, but their blades aren’t sharp enough for chopping, slicing and grating, so you won't be able to make do. Meanwhile food processors can handle these cooking tasks with aplomb, but their shallower bowls aren’t as well suited to liquids. If you want options, plump for a food processor. If you’re mainly dreaming of whipping up breakfast smoothies ASAP, buy a blender.What to look for in a food processorThe models on our list are all fairly basic, but there are still a few things worth mulling over before buying your first food processor. Firstly, consider capacity – do you need a compact appliance, or one big enough to feed your hungry pals too? Those featured here range from 1.3L to 2.3L. Next up, decide what you’d like your food processor to do. Most come with accessories for slicing, grating, chopping and kneading dough, but some – like the Vonshef – include extras like a citrus juicer and emulsifying disc. Lastly, think about power. The below machines offer between one and six speeds and all have a pulse function, which allows for controlling chopping and stops your food from turning into mush.How we test food processorsOur expert testers channelled their inner Paris Hilton to put a range of wallet-friendly food processors through their paces, using them just as you would at home – they grated carrots, cheese and chocolate, sliced cucumbers and chopped onion, bread and whole hazelnuts. They even minced beef.Obvs, they also had to judge how well each appliance handled baking, so they whipped cream, kneaded dough and mixed cake batter, before baking the cake to ensure it emerged suitably airy and delicious. Star baker, here you come...

It’s GBBO season, so if you’re ready to elevate your baking skills from lockdown banana bread to plaited loaf, there’s one gadget that will make all the difference. Enter the multi-tasking food processor.

This ace appliance chops and slices and kneads. Some even blend – it’s like having your own sous chef to do the heavy lifting. Simply set it to work and get on with the next step of the recipe – or check back in on Tiktok, we ain’t judgin’.

What food processor should I buy?

Predictably, these do-it-all machines don’t usually come cheap, but our dedicated testing team has done what they do best and found five trusty food processors that won’t leave you weeping into your third consecutive baked bean tea.

Ready to earn that Hollywood handshake? Here are tried and tested faves for less than £100:

What’s the difference between a food processor and a blender?

While some food processors come with a jug blender attachment, this isn’t the case for all of them, so it’s worth thinking about which machine would be most helpful in your kitchen.

Blenders have smoothies and soups nailed, but their blades aren’t sharp enough for chopping, slicing and grating, so you won't be able to make do. Meanwhile food processors can handle these cooking tasks with aplomb, but their shallower bowls aren’t as well suited to liquids. If you want options, plump for a food processor.

If you’re mainly dreaming of whipping up breakfast smoothies ASAP, buy a blender.

What to look for in a food processor

The models on our list are all fairly basic, but there are still a few things worth mulling over before buying your first food processor. Firstly, consider capacity – do you need a compact appliance, or one big enough to feed your hungry pals too? Those featured here range from 1.3L to 2.3L.

Next up, decide what you’d like your food processor to do. Most come with accessories for slicing, grating, chopping and kneading dough, but some – like the Vonshef – include extras like a citrus juicer and emulsifying disc.

Lastly, think about power. The below machines offer between one and six speeds and all have a pulse function, which allows for controlling chopping and stops your food from turning into mush.

How we test food processors

Our expert testers channelled their inner Paris Hilton to put a range of wallet-friendly food processors through their paces, using them just as you would at home – they grated carrots, cheese and chocolate, sliced cucumbers and chopped onion, bread and whole hazelnuts. They even minced beef.

Obvs, they also had to judge how well each appliance handled baking, so they whipped cream, kneaded dough and mixed cake batter, before baking the cake to ensure it emerged suitably airy and delicious.

Star baker, here you come...

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