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7 Foods That Might Be Giving You B.O.

Health Logo By Amanda Gardner of Health | Slide 1 of 8: Sure, the smell of your last meal can linger around your house–for better or worse–but it can also change your smell. What causes body odor? Not sweat itself, which has no scent–it’s basically water and electrolytes. Instead, B.O. comes from a sort of chemical reaction. “Most normal body odors are the interaction of skin bacteria with secretions in the area,” says George Preti, PhD, a member of Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia. Food might alter this smell because certain byproducts get secreted as our bodies break down what we eat, then react with the bacteria on our skin, explains John Swartzberg, MD, chair of the editorial board of the University of California Berkeley Wellness Letter. There’s not a huge amount of scientific evidence pointing to which foods are the worst offenders, but there’s enough anecdotal evidence to give us a sense of what kinds of foods find their way into our body odor. Here’s what we know. RELATED: The Weird Reason Why Stress Sweat Might Smell Worse Than Exercise Sweat

Foods that cause body odor

Sure, the smell of your last meal can linger around your house–for better or worse–but it can also change your smell.

What causes body odor? Not sweat itself, which has no scent–it’s basically water and electrolytes. Instead, B.O. comes from a sort of chemical reaction.

“Most normal body odors are the interaction of skin bacteria with secretions in the area,” says George Preti, PhD, a member of Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia.

Food might alter this smell because certain byproducts get secreted as our bodies break down what we eat, then react with the bacteria on our skin, explains John Swartzberg, MD, chair of the editorial board of the University of California Berkeley Wellness Letter.

There’s not a huge amount of scientific evidence pointing to which foods are the worst offenders, but there’s enough anecdotal evidence to give us a sense of what kinds of foods find their way into our body odor.

Here’s what we know.

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