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Drinking full-fat milk may actually be better for your heart than having skimmed

Mirror logo Mirror 31/01/2018 Pat Hagan

Credits: Getty © Provided by Trinity Mirror Shared Services Limited Credits: Getty Full-fat milk may be better for the heart than “healthy” skimmed alternatives, a study has found.

It boosted levels of “good” HDL cholesterol in the bloodstream, said researchers at the University of Copenhagen in Denmark.

Their report stated: “Dietary guidelines have for decades recommended choosing low-fat dairy products due to the high content of saturated fat in dairy known to increase blood concentration of LDL cholesterol .

Credits: PA © Provided by Trinity Mirror Shared Services Limited Credits: PA “But studies show no association between overall dairy intake and risk of cardiovascular disease and even point to an inverse association with type 2 diabetes.

"Our findings suggest whole milk might be considered a part of a healthy diet among the healthy population.”

The findings fly in the face of decades of health advice. Health experts have long advocated switching to skimmed or semi-skimmed milk, as well as other low-fat dairy products, to reduce the risk of clogged arteries that could trigger a heart attack or stroke.

a close up of a device © Getty As a result, sales of low-fat dairy products in the UK have soared in recent years, with 85 per cent of all milk sold now skimmed or semi-skimmed.

In 2016, the same team found eating low-fat cheese did not reduce cholesterol, cut blood pressure or help to trim the waistline.

Volunteers who spent three months chomping on a daily portion of regular fat-cheese, or a low-calorie option, saw little or no difference in heart disease risk by the end of the experiment.

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