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20 Ways to Change the Way You Think About Your Body

Eat This, Not That! Logo By Karla Walsh of Eat This, Not That! | Slide 2 of 21: “Ugh, my thighs are as lumpy as cottage cheese.” “My upper arms are so jiggly, I don’t even wave anymore!” Sound familiar? We are all-too-quick to criticize ourselves for our perceived faults but rarely affirm our awesomeness.”Would you say the same horrible things you say to yourself to your daughter, sister or best friend? Remember that you are, or should be, your own best friend. Treat yourself accordingly,” Raimo says. The first step to halting this habit is identifying the negative, body shaming statements throughout the day and tracking how common they are, says Abby Olson, RD, owner of Encompass Nutrition in St. Paul, MN.Once you observe that negative voice rearing its head, counter it with two compliments for every put-down. “If you can’t find something positive about your body initially, then find something positive about yourself as a whole—or even start by thinking something positive about life in general,” Olson says. This will help you establish a new pattern when those negative thoughts are triggered. Something as simple as “I’m grateful of my strong legs that climbed the stairs this morning” or “I’m blessed to have a comfortable bed to sleep in after a busy day” will do the trick.

1. Think: Two Ups for Every Down

“Ugh, my thighs are as lumpy as cottage cheese.” “My upper arms are so jiggly, I don’t even wave anymore!” Sound familiar? We are all-too-quick to criticize ourselves for our perceived faults but rarely affirm our awesomeness.

”Would you say the same horrible things you say to yourself to your daughter, sister or best friend? Remember that you are, or should be, your own best friend. Treat yourself accordingly,” Raimo says. The first step to halting this habit is identifying the negative, body shaming statements throughout the day and tracking how common they are, says Abby Olson, RD, owner of Encompass Nutrition in St. Paul, MN.

Once you observe that negative voice rearing its head, counter it with two compliments for every put-down. “If you can’t find something positive about your body initially, then find something positive about yourself as a whole—or even start by thinking something positive about life in general,” Olson says. This will help you establish a new pattern when those negative thoughts are triggered. Something as simple as “I’m grateful of my strong legs that climbed the stairs this morning” or “I’m blessed to have a comfortable bed to sleep in after a busy day” will do the trick.

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