You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

The common decoration mistake that makes our Christmas trees wilt faster

House Beautiful (UK) logo House Beautiful (UK) 09/12/2018 Natalie Cornish
a fire place sitting in front of a christmas tree: Is your Christmas tree turning brown and dropping its needles? Your fruit bowl might be to blame. Find real Christmas tree care tips at Countrliving.com/uk. © Hoxton/Tom Merton - Getty Images Is your Christmas tree turning brown and dropping its needles? Your fruit bowl might be to blame. Find real Christmas tree care tips at Countrliving.com/uk.

A special message from MSN:

While Christmas is a time of joy for most of us, that's not the case for the UK's most vulnerable children and young people. We've partnered with giving platform Benevity to raise funds for two charities - the NSPCC and The Children's Society – to try to help change that. You can help make a difference - please donate now.

A fruit bowl filled to the brim with Christmassy clementines, grapes, apricots, pears, plums, pomegranates, dates and bananas makes a bare mantelpiece look much more festive.

But, as some fruit ripens, it gives off a gas that can prematurely wilt your tree.

Video: How to Decorate a Pineapple Christmas Tree (Coastal Living)

Replay Video

Ethylene is omitted by stone fruit and bananas, causing other ethylene-sensitive fruits, like apples, to spot and brown.

Unfortunately it can have the same affect on confiners and houseplants, making the needles (and leaves) brown and drop sooner than they should.

a bowl of fruit sitting on top of a wooden table: Ripe fresh red apples in bowl with cinnamon on wooden background. Autumn harvest. Christmas decoration © Maryviolet - Getty Images Ripe fresh red apples in bowl with cinnamon on wooden background. Autumn harvest. Christmas decoration Apricots, avocados, bananas, melons, kiwis, mangoes, nectarines, peaches, pears and plums are the worst ethylene gas offenders.

B&Q says its best to keep your fruit bowl away from your tree, so it looks fresh and full until the new year.

The DIY chain also advises customers to keep their Christmas trees away from radiators, which makes sense because conifers are used to cold climates.

Don't be afraid to water your tree daily, too. Christmas trees can drink up to two litres a day, depending on size, and hydration is crucial to ensuring the conifer stays looking plump and full.

Gallery: Chic ways to decorate your home for Christmas (Elle Decor)

AdChoices
AdChoices

More from House Beautiful

House Beautiful (UK)
House Beautiful (UK)
image beaconimage beaconimage beacon