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Where to buy face masks right now

Prima (UK) Logo By Roshina Jowaheer of Prima (UK) | Slide 1 of 36: Want to know where to buy face masks in the UK? You can buy a face mask from most places these days, such as Amazon, Etsy, and fashion brands like Seasalt and Marks & Spencer as well as John Lewis and department store Liberty. Even the local corner shops, but which face mask is best and which face mask should you buy?What are the new face mask rules?Boris Johnson has announced that face coverings will once again become mandatory in shops and on public transport in England from Tuesday (30 November), as part of measures to target the new coronavirus variant called Omicron.While wearing a face mask is become the norm for most of us, in July 2021 the rules changed meaning people weren't legally required to wear face masks in England in indoor settings or on public transport. However, because of the new variant and with a tricky winter ahead of us, the law has now been put back in place. Although these measures are considered "temporary and precautionary", the PM said the masks were important. He also announced that PCR tests for everyone entering the UK will be introduced and all contacts of new variant cases will have to self-isolate, even if fully jabbed. Britons have also been urged to scale back their socialising in the run-up to Christmas. Chief Medical Officer Chris Whitty told a Downing Street briefing on Wednesday (16 December) that people should “prioritise the social interactions that mean a lot to them” in the following weeks.The Prime Minister added that the public should “think carefully” before attending any social gatherings, especially those involving strangers. Unsurprisingly many people want to wear face coverings in shops, supermarkets, post offices, indoor shopping centres, hospitals, transport hubs, banks, places of worship, museums and when buying takeaway food and drink to help stop the spread of coronavirus.Across the rest of the United Kingdom, the rules differ by country.In Scotland, face coverings are mandatory in most public places for everyone aged 12 or older. These includes shops, bars, restaurants, cafes and nightclubs as well as churches and public transport. First Minister Nicolar Sturgeon has refused to rule out additional restrictions if they are required. At a press conference on Friday (10 December) Ms Sturgeon added that the Scottish Government will “consider its next steps very carefully” in the wake of the new Omicron variant. In Northern Ireland the use of face coverings is now required in all indoor settings accessible to the public including shops, shopping centres, public, private and school transport services, taxis, airplanes, public transport stations and airports, banks, churches, cinemas, and some government offices.In Wales, face coverings must be worn in all indoor public places, and public transport, including taxis. At present, you don't need to wear face coverings in places where food and drink is served, such as pubs, cafes and restaurants or wear them at a wedding civil partnership or alternative wedding ceremonies.Read on to find out why face masks help stop the spread of coronavirus and where you can buy face masks online.Why are we wearing face masks?Wearing a face mask, or other face covering, in enclosed spaces, such as shops, supermarkets, GP surgeries and post offices, "may reduce the spread of coronavirus droplets in certain circumstances, helping to protect others". Officials have stressed that face coverings are not a replacement for social distancing but are "intended to protect others, not the wearer, from coronavirus" in places where it's trickier to keep a large distance from people. Can wearing face masks stop the virus?Face masks won't stop coronavirus from spreading so you still need to follow health officials' advice for social distancing and washing your hands regularly. What they can do is help reduce the likelihood that you pass it on if you are suffering from the virus – remember that there are also people who don't show symptoms of Covid-19. As Professor Chris Whitty, the government's Chief Medical Officer, puts it, wearing a face covering "is an added precaution that may have some benefit in reducing the likelihood that a person with the infection passes it on." Most retailers producing these commercially-available face masks state that the face masks they sell are not sold as Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for health and care workers to use in the work place.Are there exceptions to who wears face masks?Those with a disability, certain health conditions or are under a certain age do not have to wear a face mask even when it's a legal requirement for everyone else to. Exemption badges are available for those who feel more comfortable wearing something that says you do not have to wear one but this is a personal choice.  The government says: "Face coverings should not be used by children under the age of three or those who may find it difficult to manage them correctly." Children under 11 in England do not have to wear a face mask.In Scotland, face masks and other coverings should not be used for children under the age of 12. Meanwhile, Northern Ireland says children under 13 don't have to wear face coverings.Wearing a face covering could be particularly challenging for asthma sufferers to breathe properly and Asthma UK says don't wear one if you are finding it hard.What to look for in a face mask?Before you buy a face mask, you'll want to think about a few features that will cover your needs. For instance, is it breathable? Does it fit snugly over your face? Do you have a member of the family who lip reads and requires a transparent face mask? Is it washable? Does it secure around your ears with elastic or tie-up straps? While the government advice was for people to make their own face masks at home (here's an easy no-sew method) to ensure surgical masks remain available for health and care workers, there are now many reusable, washable and non-medical face masks that you can buy online from well-known UK retailers - from John Lewis to Etsy. These cover various needs, whether you're looking for adult, child or teen face masks. Which face mask should you buy? With many people opting to continue wearing their face masks, below is our roundup of the best face masks to buy online in the UK. From a pack of simple but practical black and white face masks from Amazon to Boden's beautifully printed face masks, here are 59 you can shop right now. We've even picked some floral-print ones like the Duchess of Cambridge face mask and coverings from Joules and Reiss.You'll also find face masks for kids, which come in cool dinosaur, rainbow or Disney designs. And when it comes to the teens, there are face masks for Harry Potter fans, stylish leopard-print masks and designs they can customise.Here are some breathable, lightweight styles for travelling and hot weather, too.Be sure to wash your hands before touching the face mask to wear it, before removing it and after you have taken it off. *Here's some advice from the World Health Organization on wearing a face mask safely.

Want to know where to buy face masks in the UK? You can buy a face mask from most places these days, such as Amazon, Etsy, and fashion brands like Seasalt and Marks & Spencer as well as John Lewis and department store Liberty.

Even the local corner shops, but which face mask is best and which face mask should you buy?

What are the new face mask rules?

Boris Johnson has announced that face coverings will once again become mandatory in shops and on public transport in England from Tuesday (30 November), as part of measures to target the new coronavirus variant called Omicron.

While wearing a face mask is become the norm for most of us, in July 2021 the rules changed meaning people weren't legally required to wear face masks in England in indoor settings or on public transport. However, because of the new variant and with a tricky winter ahead of us, the law has now been put back in place.

Although these measures are considered "temporary and precautionary", the PM said the masks were important. He also announced that PCR tests for everyone entering the UK will be introduced and all contacts of new variant cases will have to self-isolate, even if fully jabbed.

Britons have also been urged to scale back their socialising in the run-up to Christmas. Chief Medical Officer Chris Whitty told a Downing Street briefing on Wednesday (16 December) that people should “prioritise the social interactions that mean a lot to them” in the following weeks.
The Prime Minister added that the public should “think carefully” before attending any social gatherings, especially those involving strangers.
Unsurprisingly many people want to wear face coverings in shops, supermarkets, post offices, indoor shopping centres, hospitals, transport hubs, banks, places of worship, museums and when buying takeaway food and drink to help stop the spread of coronavirus.

Across the rest of the United Kingdom, the rules differ by country.

In Scotland, face coverings are mandatory in most public places for everyone aged 12 or older. These includes shops, bars, restaurants, cafes and nightclubs as well as churches and public transport. First Minister Nicolar Sturgeon has refused to rule out additional restrictions if they are required. At a press conference on Friday (10 December) Ms Sturgeon added that the Scottish Government will “consider its next steps very carefully” in the wake of the new Omicron variant.

In Northern Ireland the use of face coverings is now required in all indoor settings accessible to the public including shops, shopping centres, public, private and school transport services, taxis, airplanes, public transport stations and airports, banks, churches, cinemas, and some government offices.

In Wales, face coverings must be worn in all indoor public places, and public transport, including taxis. At present, you don't need to wear face coverings in places where food and drink is served, such as pubs, cafes and restaurants or wear them at a wedding civil partnership or alternative wedding ceremonies.

Read on to find out why face masks help stop the spread of coronavirus and where you can buy face masks online.

Why are we wearing face masks?

Wearing a face mask, or other face covering, in enclosed spaces, such as shops, supermarkets, GP surgeries and post offices, "may reduce the spread of coronavirus droplets in certain circumstances, helping to protect others". Officials have stressed that face coverings are not a replacement for social distancing but are "intended to protect others, not the wearer, from coronavirus" in places where it's trickier to keep a large distance from people.

Can wearing face masks stop the virus?

Face masks won't stop coronavirus from spreading so you still need to follow health officials' advice for social distancing and washing your hands regularly.

What they can do is help reduce the likelihood that you pass it on if you are suffering from the virus – remember that there are also people who don't show symptoms of Covid-19.

As Professor Chris Whitty, the government's Chief Medical Officer, puts it, wearing a face covering "is an added precaution that may have some benefit in reducing the likelihood that a person with the infection passes it on."

Most retailers producing these commercially-available face masks state that the face masks they sell are not sold as Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for health and care workers to use in the work place.

Are there exceptions to who wears face masks?

Those with a disability, certain health conditions or are under a certain age do not have to wear a face mask even when it's a legal requirement for everyone else to. Exemption badges are available for those who feel more comfortable wearing something that says you do not have to wear one but this is a personal choice.

The government says: "Face coverings should not be used by children under the age of three or those who may find it difficult to manage them correctly." Children under 11 in England do not have to wear a face mask.

In Scotland, face masks and other coverings should not be used for children under the age of 12. Meanwhile, Northern Ireland says children under 13 don't have to wear face coverings.

Wearing a face covering could be particularly challenging for asthma sufferers to breathe properly and Asthma UK says don't wear one if you are finding it hard.

What to look for in a face mask?

Before you buy a face mask, you'll want to think about a few features that will cover your needs. For instance, is it breathable? Does it fit snugly over your face? Do you have a member of the family who lip reads and requires a transparent face mask? Is it washable? Does it secure around your ears with elastic or tie-up straps?

While the government advice was for people to make their own face masks at home (here's an easy no-sew method) to ensure surgical masks remain available for health and care workers, there are now many reusable, washable and non-medical face masks that you can buy online from well-known UK retailers - from John Lewis to Etsy. These cover various needs, whether you're looking for adult, child or teen face masks.

Which face mask should you buy?

With many people opting to continue wearing their face masks, below is our roundup of the best face masks to buy online in the UK. From a pack of simple but practical black and white face masks from Amazon to Boden's beautifully printed face masks, here are 59 you can shop right now. We've even picked some floral-print ones like the Duchess of Cambridge face mask and coverings from Joules and Reiss.

You'll also find face masks for kids, which come in cool dinosaur, rainbow or Disney designs. And when it comes to the teens, there are face masks for Harry Potter fans, stylish leopard-print masks and designs they can customise.

Here are some breathable, lightweight styles for travelling and hot weather, too.

Be sure to wash your hands before touching the face mask to wear it, before removing it and after you have taken it off.
*Here's some advice from the World Health Organization on wearing a face mask safely.

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