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What to do if you want to get up on a plane but the aisle passenger is asleep

Mirror logo Mirror 11/06/2019 Julie Delahaye

Close up shot of a young man asleep with his head back snoring on a flight in economy class. He is wearing wireless headphones and has an eye mask on. © Getty Close up shot of a young man asleep with his head back snoring on a flight in economy class. He is wearing wireless headphones and has an eye mask on. We've all been there during a flight; you're sat in the window or aisle seat and need to go to the loo, or want to get up and stretch your legs.

Of course that means politely asking everyone else on your row (who happen to be blocking your path) to get up to let you out.

It seems that most of us Brits are too polite, as new research from Expedia revealed that nearly a quarter of us admit to staying in their seat and waiting until the passenger gets up as we don't want to wake them up.

But what are the rules?

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Fear not fellow Brits, as etiquette expert William Hanson has teamed up with Expedia to share those unwritten flight etiquette rules.

Despite our reluctance to wake others up, William says it's "perfectly acceptable to do so".

In fact, he points out it can be very awkward for everyone involved if you try clambering over them.

He told Mirror Online exclusively: "Especially considering eight per cent of passengers have been woken up by their neighbours climbing over them, which is both a peculiar and startling way to rouse from a slumber. A gentle nudge and an apologetic smile is all it takes."

a group of people sitting in a chair: Climbing over a fellow passenger is just awkward © Getty Images Climbing over a fellow passenger is just awkward But what if you're the one on the aisle seat and you're starting to feel a little sleepy?

Turns out there's a common courtesy to be found here too.

William advises: "If you are in a middle or aisle seat, please alert your neighbours that you will probably fall asleep and how it’s totally fine for them to gently nudge you should they need to vacate their own seat and stretch their legs.

"This can help minimise any worry they may be having about disturbing you."

MSN are empowering Women In Sport this summer. Find out more about our campaign and the charity fighting to promote the transformational and lifelong rewards of exercise for women and girls in the UK here.

Gallery: 17 travel tricks flight attendants say can save you time, money, and aggravation [Business Insider]

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