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How Not To RSVP To A Wedding

Refinery29 Logo By Natalie Gontcharova of Refinery29 | Slide 1 of 6: <p>Between trying to pay your bills, working or studying, and maybe even taking care of kids, life is crazy enough. So when wedding invitations start trickling in — usually by your mid- or late twenties — it's easy to get overwhelmed. Forget actually getting married, just <a href="http://www.refinery29.com/wedding-guest-money-saving-tips">attending a wedding</a> can be forbiddingly pricey.</p><p>And then, you have to deal with snail mail. While more couples are forgoing old-school printed invitations with self-addressed, stamped RSVPs in favour of the (in theory easier) digital ones, most are still opting for the traditional version — whether it's for sentimentality's sake or to keep older relatives happy. A writer on Mic recently called paper invites "<a href="https://mic.com/articles/178167/printed-wedding-invitations-are-an-obsolete-relic-that-need-to-die#.H7C7scFNd">an obsolete relic that needs to die</a>," but we wouldn't go that far. What monster doesn't enjoy a pretty <a href="http://www.refinery29.com/wedding-invitations">wedding invitation</a>? Still, mail is easy to lose, and when was the last time you actually sent a letter?</p><p>All of that said, being invited to a wedding is an honour, so you should treat it like one. As someone who recently got married, I've seen all types of easily avoidable RSVP mistakes. So here's how you can not be that person who <a href="http://www.refinery29.com/wedding-guest-etiquette">makes things more difficult</a> for the already stressed-out couple. Then again, if you can't make it, whether it's for financial or personal reasons, it's your prerogative to say no, <a href="http://www.refinery29.com/how-to-decline-wedding-invite-etiquette">politely and on-time</a>.</p><p>Ahead, how not to RSVP when your next wedding invitation comes in the mail.</p>

Between trying to pay your bills, working or studying, and maybe even taking care of kids, life is crazy enough. So when wedding invitations start trickling in — usually by your mid- or late twenties — it's easy to get overwhelmed. Forget actually getting married, just attending a wedding can be forbiddingly pricey.

And then, you have to deal with snail mail. While more couples are forgoing old-school printed invitations with self-addressed, stamped RSVPs in favour of the (in theory easier) digital ones, most are still opting for the traditional version — whether it's for sentimentality's sake or to keep older relatives happy. A writer on Mic recently called paper invites "an obsolete relic that needs to die," but we wouldn't go that far. What monster doesn't enjoy a pretty wedding invitation? Still, mail is easy to lose, and when was the last time you actually sent a letter?

All of that said, being invited to a wedding is an honour, so you should treat it like one. As someone who recently got married, I've seen all types of easily avoidable RSVP mistakes. So here's how you can not be that person who makes things more difficult for the already stressed-out couple. Then again, if you can't make it, whether it's for financial or personal reasons, it's your prerogative to say no, politely and on-time.

Ahead, how not to RSVP when your next wedding invitation comes in the mail.

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