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The Royal Mail 'missed delivery' card that's actually fake - how to spot one and what you can do about it

Mirror logo Mirror 09/08/2017 John Fitzsimons
Credits: Getty© Provided by Trinity Mirror Shared Services Limited Credits: Getty

Warnings have been raised around a new scam which makes use of convincing - but fake - 'missed delivery' cards.

The cards look very much like the ‘something for you’ cards you typically receive from Royal Mail when you have missed a delivery.

They use the same colour scheme, headings and four-box layout. Indeed, the only clear difference is that the scammers’ cards do not have the Royal Mail logo on them.

Recipients are invited to call a number beginning 0208 in order to arrange a delivery.

They are then put through to an automated message where they are asked to leave their details and a ‘consignment number’. Victims have claimed that calling the number - which isn’t registered to Royal Mail - has cost them £45.

A spokesperson for the Royal Mail said that it was looking into the scam as a “matter of urgency”, adding that people receiving missed delivery notes should be vigilant and ensure that they contain the Royal Mail’s logo.

An old scam making a return

Credits: Royal Mail© Provided by Trinity Mirror Shared Services Limited Credits: Royal Mail

While this particular version is new, scammers have seen the value in using fake missed delivery notes for some time now.

For example, back in 2015 fraud experts Action Fraud highlighted a scam where postcards were being delivered to homes, claiming that a parcel containing jewellery was waiting to be collected.

The postcards said: “The office is attempting to reach you. To claim this parcel and accept this offer, you must telephone the number below immediately and arrange for a delivery.

"The item is prepaid, but a processing and delivery free of £10 must be remitted. This fee can be paid only by telephone and only with a credit card (VISA or MasterCard). This is your only notification”

Of course, even after the money was paid, no such delivery took place.

Are you expecting a delivery?

There is undeniably something exciting about getting a parcel, rather than a letter. For one thing, at least it won't be a bill!

It may seem obvious, but any time you receive a note through the letterbox about a missed delivery, the first question should be whether you have actually ordered anything.

RELATED: 16 sneaky scams that are fooling thousands of Brits - and how to spot them

16 sneaky scams thousands are falling for – and how to spot them

If you haven’t ordered jewellery, and nor has anyone else in your household, then alarm bells should ring if you receive a note saying that you have missed a delivery.

Even if you are expecting a delivery, check the card over thoroughly. Does it look like everything is above board? Are the delivery firm’s logo and contact details clearly laid out?

You should never hand over your card details, and you should be very wary about your personal details too. If you are in any doubt about the legitimacy of the note, it’s a good idea to get in touch with Action Fraud, who are better placed to advise on whether the note matches up with other calls they have received.

NOW SEE: Why signing for a neighbour's parcel could land you in court

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