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Morning Briefing: November 7, 2018 (WEDNESDAY)

07/11/2018 News desk

Good morning. Here’s what you need to know to start your day with our daily briefing, compiled by Aashna Jawal.

'Tremendous success': Trump puts on happy face despite House bloodbath   

U.S. President Donald Trump acknowledges supporters at a campaign rally at the Show Me Center in Cape Girardeau Missouri © Reuters U.S. President Donald Trump acknowledges supporters at a campaign rally at the Show Me Center in Cape Girardeau Missouri President Donald Trump said Tuesday night that he considered Election Day's 'tremendous success,' hours after it became clear that the Democratic Party would control the House of Representatives during the next two years. Democrats who stand to return next year as chairmen of the House Oversight and Judiciary Committees are already sharpening their pens and preparing to drag Trump through his own swamp. (Daily Mail) Meanwhile, Minnesota state Rep. Ilhan Omar has become one of the first Muslim women elected to Congress. (Vox.com)

Britain suffers a ‘stabbing hour’ after school bell

Britain suffers a ‘stabbing hour’ after school when children are at greater risk of being attacked as they make their way home, an alarming new study has found. Researchers at Queen Mary University of London reviewed case reports from nearly 2,000 under-25s who were admitted to a trauma centre in the capital between 2004 and 2014. (The Telegraph)

Torrential rain and strong winds as 'pressure vortex' hits

Be prepared for non-stop rain and gale-force winds today as a huge vortex hits the UK. The Met Office issued a yellow weather warning for rain, with heavy showers mainly expected to affect south Wales and southwest England early this morning. (Mirror)

Egyptian museum renews call for return of Rosetta Stone

Visitors admire the ancient Egyptian Rosetta Stone in Room 4 of the British Museum, on 11th April 2018, in London, England. (Photo by Richard Baker / In Pictures via Getty Images) © Getty Visitors admire the ancient Egyptian Rosetta Stone in Room 4 of the British Museum, on 11th April 2018, in London, England. (Photo by Richard Baker / In Pictures via Getty Images) An Egyptian museum has renewed calls for the Rosetta Stone to be returned back to Egypt after more than 200 years in the British Museum. The ancient slab, which is engraved with three languages and unlocked the secret of Egyptian hieroglyphs, has been a long-running source of tension between Cairo and London. (The Telegraph)

In Depth: The bitter Twitter battle over relationship tagging

Relationship tagging is simply including your partner’s Twitter handle in your bio, often in a cheeky way. © Shutterstock Relationship tagging is simply including your partner’s Twitter handle in your bio, often in a cheeky way. There’s an unspoken truth about the internet that all social-media platforms eventually devolve into dating platforms, and Twitter is no different. This is the platform that invented the concept of sliding into someone’s DMs; lurking and flirting are common among singles. (The Atlantic)

Video of the day: How invisible forces protect our Earth

How invisible forces protect our Earth © National Geographic How invisible forces protect our Earth Electromagnetism is one of the four fundamental forces of nature. Learn about the relationship between electricity and magnetism and how an invisible force protects our entire planet. (National Geographic)

On this day

A general view at Ensisheim meteorite during the press conference and exhibition preview at the Natural History Museum on November 15, 2013 in Vienna, Austria. The Ensisheim meteorite is a stony meteorite observed to fall on November 7, 1492 © Getty A general view at Ensisheim meteorite during the press conference and exhibition preview at the Natural History Museum on November 15, 2013 in Vienna, Austria. The Ensisheim meteorite is a stony meteorite observed to fall on November 7, 1492 1492: A boy just outside the walled village of Ensisheim, in what will one day be Alsace, France, witnesses a huge fireball fall from the sky and plunge a metre deep into a field. Locals, who view the meteorite as a good omen, will chisel pieces of the heavenly stone for themselves until a local official ordered them to stop. (Bing)

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