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Solar eclipse 2017: Stargazers vent their frustration as cloudy weather ruins spectacle in UK

Evening Standard logo Evening Standard 21/08/2017 Jonathan Mitchell
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Scores of disappointed stargazers have taken to social media to vent their frustration as typical British weather stopped them seeing the solar eclipse.

Cloudy skies ruined many Britons' chances of seeing the eclipse, with the spectacle originally expected to appear in the UK’s skies just before sunset on Monday.

Millions of Americans watched in wonder through telescopes, cameras and protective glasses as the eclipse swept across the United States.

But Britons were forced to mockingly post pictures of cloudy skies over the UK, with others taking snaps of their TV screens showing the eclipse across the pond.

Stunning images of emerged of the eclipse over the US, with Americans praising the spectacle as “beautiful”.

Related: Time-lapse: Awesome first moments of solar eclipse (Video provided by: USA TODAY)

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One Twitter user, known only as Dapika, posted: “So the partial eclipse in the UK is literally just clouds."

The partial eclipse did appear in Weymouth, but was blocked by clouds across much of the UK (Met Office)

Donjna Rachel said: “Today's eclipse *could* have been seen in the UK... were it not for the thick blanket of cloud that shrouds the country at all times.”

Sabina added: “Didn't see any form of eclipse, once again the UK is a disappointment.”

About 4 per cent of the sun was expected to be blotted out over British skies, with the eclipse supposedly visible from 7.40pm.

But forecasters warned that grey skies and overcast weather could prevent Brits from being able to see any of the phenomenon.

The movement of the moon between the Earth and sun turned day to night for more than two minutes at each location along a narrow corridor stretching across the country.

Tracking east over 90 minutes, the eclipse travelled across 14 states from Oregon to South Carolina, before heading out over the Atlantic.

Met Office forecaster Martin Bowles warned on Monday morning: "It doesn't look very promising."

"It is only going to be about 4 per cent of the sun which will be blotted out, so even if it is perfect weather conditions you won't see a lot," he added.

But it was not doom and gloom for all of the UK’s stargazers, with some people reporting seeing the eclipse in coastal towns in areas such as Devon.

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