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Tunnel into the past! From 'British Museum' to 'Down Street', the fascinating London Underground map that shows every single abandoned 'GHOST STATION'

Daily Mail logo Daily Mail 24/09/2018 Ted Thornhill for MailOnline

a close up of a map: There are 49 abandoned stations on the London Underground network ¿ and they have all been detailed on a fascinating map. The abandoned stations are marked in grey and on this central London section include Down Street, Brompton Road and Aldwych on the blue Piccadilly line, British Museum on the red Central line and City Road on the black Northern line © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited There are 49 abandoned stations on the London Underground network ¿ and they have all been detailed on a fascinating map. The abandoned stations are marked in grey and on this central London section include Down Street, Brompton Road and Aldwych on the blue Piccadilly line, British Museum on the red Central line and City Road on the black Northern line There are 49 abandoned stations on the 249-mile-long London Underground network – and they have all been detailed on a fascinating map of it.

a close up of a map: In this section of the map abandoned stations such as St Mary's (District line), which closed in 1938, and Shoreditch (East London line), which closed in 1940, are indicated. St Mary's station was destroyed by a bomb during the Second World War © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited In this section of the map abandoned stations such as St Mary's (District line), which closed in 1938, and Shoreditch (East London line), which closed in 1940, are indicated. St Mary's station was destroyed by a bomb during the Second World War It has been created by Franklin Jarrier, who not only names these ‘ghost stations’ - marked in grey on the map - but indicates the date they closed.

Inside Brompton Road Underground station, which closed in 1934. It was then sold to the War Office in 1938. Abandonedstations.org.uk said of the former Piccadilly line station that 'it fell victim to bad planning - i.e putting one where it wasn't needed' © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Inside Brompton Road Underground station, which closed in 1934. It was then sold to the War Office in 1938. Abandonedstations.org.uk said of the former Piccadilly line station that 'it fell victim to bad planning - i.e putting one where it wasn't needed' What’s more, his map shows the actual layout of the Tube’s various tracks and shows the overground network, too, along with its abandoned stations. The level of detail is astonishing - even platform numbers are pinpointed.

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a building lit up at night: Inside York Road on the Piccadilly line. It was closed on September 17, 1932, because of low passenger numbers © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Inside York Road on the Piccadilly line. It was closed on September 17, 1932, because of low passenger numbers Transport for London (TfL) explains that the abandoned stations – some of which have vanished without trace, some of which are still intact - were closed for a range of reasons, from lines being rerouted to low passenger numbers.

a close up of a map: Mummy mia! The map shows how the Central line used to have a British Museum stop, but it was closed in 1933. It was shut and replaced by Holborn nearby, which provided an interchange with the Piccadilly line. Before this passengers were having to walk at street level to change lines © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Mummy mia! The map shows how the Central line used to have a British Museum stop, but it was closed in 1933. It was shut and replaced by Holborn nearby, which provided an interchange with the Piccadilly line. Before this passengers were having to walk at street level to change lines For instance Blake Hall on the Central line was estimated to have only 17 passengers when it closed in 1981.

Many of these stations have fascinating histories.

a close up of a map: Tracking the past: Here closed stations Mildmay Park and Newington Road & Balls Pond are indicated © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Tracking the past: Here closed stations Mildmay Park and Newington Road & Balls Pond are indicated TfL says: 'Many stations were used as shelters for the public during the Second World War, even if they had already been closed for service - City Road [Northern line] for example.

a close up of a map: South London used to have an overground Camberwell station and Walworth Road station. They were both closed in 1916 © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited South London used to have an overground Camberwell station and Walworth Road station. They were both closed in 1916 'Others acted as decampment areas for both the London Passenger Transport Board Head Office staff and the government.

a close up of a map: Transport for London (TfL) explains that the abandoned stations ¿ some of which have vanished without trace, some of which are still intact - were closed for a range of reasons, from lines being rerouted to low passenger numbers. For instance Blake Hall on the Central line was estimated to have only 17 passengers when it closed in 1981. This section of the map shows the abandoned Brompton Road on the Piccadilly line. It's now used by the Ministry of Defence © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Transport for London (TfL) explains that the abandoned stations ¿ some of which have vanished without trace, some of which are still intact - were closed for a range of reasons, from lines being rerouted to low passenger numbers. For instance Blake Hall on the Central line was estimated to have only 17 passengers when it closed in 1981. This section of the map shows the abandoned Brompton Road on the Piccadilly line. It's now used by the Ministry of Defence 'Down Street [Piccadilly line] was fitted out as an underground office facility complete with telephone lines and even played host to a meeting of the War Cabinet at 20 minutes notice.

a train on a steel track with Thames Tunnel in the background: Gloom with a view: Inside South Kentish Town Underground station, which was closed on June 5, 1924. This ex-Northern line station closed through lack of use © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Gloom with a view: Inside South Kentish Town Underground station, which was closed on June 5, 1924. This ex-Northern line station closed through lack of use 'And British Prime Minister Winston Churchill took refuge in the station tunnels during the Blitz. 

A general view of a stairway in the Down Street underground station. Down Street station in Mayfair operated between 1907 and 1932 and after closing, played an important part during the Second World War when it was transformed into the Railway Executive Committee's bomb proof shelter © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited A general view of a stairway in the Down Street underground station. Down Street station in Mayfair operated between 1907 and 1932 and after closing, played an important part during the Second World War when it was transformed into the Railway Executive Committee's bomb proof shelter 'One, Brompton Road [Piccadilly line], was sold to the War Office in 1938 and is still used by the Ministry of Defence today.'

a group of people walking down a street in front of a store: The exterior of abandoned Down Street. During the height of the Blitz, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill took refuge in the station tunnels © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited The exterior of abandoned Down Street. During the height of the Blitz, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill took refuge in the station tunnels Tube stations have also played a part in Britain's cultural life, TfL continues.

a close up of a train station: In more recent years, TfL reveals, Aldwych, pictured, has doubled up as a filming location for productions as diverse as The Prodigy's Firestarter music video, Superman 4 and zombie movie 28 Weeks Later © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited In more recent years, TfL reveals, Aldwych, pictured, has doubled up as a filming location for productions as diverse as The Prodigy's Firestarter music video, Superman 4 and zombie movie 28 Weeks Later It adds: 'Aldwych station (originally Strand Station when it opened on the Piccadilly line), for example, which shut in 1994, was used to house the National Gallery's collection during WWI and British Museum artefacts (including the Elgin Marbles), during WWII.

a sign in front of a brick building: Aldwych station (originally Strand Station), which shut in 1994, was used to house the National Gallery's collection during WWI © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Aldwych station (originally Strand Station), which shut in 1994, was used to house the National Gallery's collection during WWI 'In more recent years Aldwych has doubled up as a filming location for productions as diverse as The Prodigy's Firestarter music video, Superman 4 and zombie movie 28 Weeks Later.'

Gallery: Abandoned train stations around the world and the history behind them (INSIDER)


 
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