You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

Your Morning Briefing

MSN UK 05/07/2019 News desk

Good morning. Here’s what you need to know to start your day with our daily briefing, compiled by Aashna Jawal.

Iran blasts Britain's 'piracy' after Royal Marines detain oil tanker in Gibraltar

a large ship in a body of water: Gibraltarian police and customs and a detachment of Royal Marines halted the vessel © Marcos Moreno/ AP Gibraltarian police and customs and a detachment of Royal Marines halted the vessel Britain has been plunged into a diplomatic row with Iran after Royal Marines seized an Iranian oil tanker as it passed through the Strait of Gibraltar, in a move likely to further inflame tensions in the Gulf. The Grace 1 super-tanker was boarded in the early hours of Thursday morning to prevent it from delivering a cargo of crude oil to Syria in defiance of EU sanctions, apparently following a request to the UK from the United States. (The Telegraph)

Secret files detailing security at chemical warfare base found discarded in the bin

a man sitting in a box: Daily star reporter Tim Baker , photographed with many court and medical confidential files simply thrown away in  dustbins belzize park London.                                                        PICTURE BY HUMPHREY NEMAR  3.7.2019 © Daily star Daily star reporter Tim Baker , photographed with many court and medical confidential files simply thrown away in dustbins belzize park London. PICTURE BY HUMPHREY NEMAR 3.7.2019 Files detailing security arrangements at Britain’s top-secret chemical warfare base have been found discarded in a London bin. The documents relate to Porton Down, the famous military science centre in Wiltshire, the Daily Star reports. (Mirror)

Britain could 'run out of burial space within the next five years'

Line of Tombs in Highgate Cemetery, London © Burcin Tuncer Line of Tombs in Highgate Cemetery, London Britain’s motorways have never felt particularly life-affirming, but they could become even more soulless under proposals to bury the dead alongside major roads to free up room in cemeteries. Professor John Ashton, former president of the Faculty of Public Health, has called for green burial corridors next to roads, railways and country footpaths. British graveyards are close to capacity, and with 500,000 deaths in England and Wales each year, it is estimated there will be no more plots left within five years. (The Telegraph)

The best way to fight climate change - plant a billion trees

a view of a mountain © Photography by Vladimir Smirnov/ TASS/ Getty   An area the size of the United States could be restored as forests with the potential of erasing nearly 100 years of carbon emissions, according to the first ever study to determine how many trees the Earth could support. Published in Science, "The global tree restoration potential” report found that there is enough suitable land to increase the world’s forest cover by one-third without affecting existing cities or agriculture. However, the amount of suitable land area diminishes as global temperatures rise. Even if global warming is limited to 1.5 degrees Celsius, the area available for forest restoration could be reduced by a fifth by 2050 because it would be too warm for some tropical forests. (National Geographic)

Paralysed patients regain use of their hands with the pioneering nerve transfer operation

a man sitting in a chair © Provided by Independent Digital News & Media Limited People who were left paralysed by traumatic spinal damage have regained the use of their hands and the ability to perform daily tasks through a pioneering nerve transfer technique. Surgeons in Australia have successfully performed the operation in 13 young adults who were paralysed in both their arms and legs (tetraplegia) before their injury. (The Independent)

In-depth: This Roman emperor lost his lover and turned him into a god

In the last week of October, 130 AD a man died and a god was born. Primeval King Osiris drowned in the mighty waters of the Nile River, and upon his death became ancient Egypt’s most powerful god. But this man was no king. In fact, not much is known about his lineage at all. Still, he was by no means ordinary. He was the lover of the most powerful man in the world at the time, Emperor Hadrian, and his name can be found scrawled beneath countless statues and busts scattered throughout museums the world over: Antinous. (Ozy)

Video of the day: Queen befriends a 'cheeky' duck at Edinburgh farm

The Queen visited a city farm in Edinburgh where she met volunteers and was joined on a tour by a "cheeky duck who thinks she's a human". Concluding her week of royal engagements in Scotland with a visit to Gorgie City Farm, the "very interested" monarch spoke to volunteers, staff and community groups who use the farm. (Press Association)

On this day

© Associated Press 1975: Arthur Ashe grew up in Richmond, Virginia, as a skinny kid whose father forbade him to play football, but 'Bones' took easily to tennis and began practicing with a racket at age 7. Ashe's dedication to the sport culminates with the first Wimbledon men's singles win by an African American. (Bing)

For more of the most popular News, Sport, Lifestyle & Entertainment on MSN, Follow us on Facebook, and on Twitter

AdChoices
AdChoices
image beaconimage beaconimage beacon