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Your Morning Briefing

2 days ago News desk

Good morning. Here’s what you need to know to start your day with our daily briefing, compiled by Zoya Thomas.

May braces for more Cabinet resignations after Brexit deal chaos 

© PA Theresa May is braced for more Cabinet resignations after struggling through a chaotic day of fallout over her EU divorce deal. (Evening Standard) Michael Gove, the Environment Secretary, is said to be considering quitting after he called for the Prime Minister’s draft Brexit agreement to be renegotiated. (Mirror) Meanwhile, police fear the fallout from a 'no-deal' Brexit could lead to "widescale disruption and dangers for the general public" and have warned they may not have the resources to cope. (Sky News)

Khmer Rouge leaders found guilty of genocide

The last surviving leaders of the Khmer Rouge that brutally ruled Cambodia have been convicted of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes by an international tribunal. Nuon Chea, 92, and Khieu Samphan, 87, are the first Khmer Rouge officials to be found guilty of genocide and have been sentenced to life in prison. (Sky News)

David Hockney's painting sells for record-breaking £70m

David Hockneys "Portrait of an Artist (Pool with Two Figures)" during a press preview at Christie's New York © AFP David Hockneys "Portrait of an Artist (Pool with Two Figures)" during a press preview at Christie's New York A David Hockney painting has been sold for £70 million, smashing the auction record for a living artist. Hockney's 1972 work Portrait of an Artist (Pool with Two Figures) went under the hammer at Christie's in New York on Thursday. It emphatically surpassed the previous record for a work by a living artist, which was held by American Jeff Koons and one of his Balloon Dog sculptures which sold for £45.6 million in 2013. (The Telegraph)

Wilson and Sancho pay tribute to England 'legend' Rooney 

Callum Wilson and Jadon Sancho paid tribute to "legend" and "role model" Wayne Rooney following a farewell win for England's record goalscorer against the United States. (Goal.com) Meanwhile, Rooney has explained how he felt "embarrassed" in his final years at Manchester United and was left with little choice but to leave the club. (Goal.com)

Kim Jong-un supervises test of 'new ultramodern weapon'

North Korean leader Kim Jong-un has visited a test site to supervise a “newly developed ultramodern weapon”, according to state media, marking the first announcement of continued weapons development since he began a rapprochement with the United States and South Korea earlier this year. (The Guardian)

In Depth: The chess grandmaster who is fighting money laundering

Pensive and composed, Dana Reizniece-Ozola eyes the chessboard in thoughtful silence. When you watch the 36-year-old grandmaster deploy her pieces - a swift advance of the pawn, or a sweep of the rook - it’s clear she’s also a master of strategy and rapid decision-making. Both of which come in handy for her life’s other pursuit: As Latvia’s finance minister, Reizniece-Ozola is leading the charge to vanquish a particularly vexing opponent. (Ozy)

Video of the day: Mysteries of the planet Earth

Earth is the only planet known to maintain life. Find out the origins of our home planet and some of the key ingredients that help make this blue speck in space a unique global ecosystem. (National Geographic)

On this day

British art historian Sir Anthony Blunt (1907 - 1983), Surveyor of the Queen's Pictures, at Hampton Court Palace, 1975. He was publicly revealed as a Soviet spy in 1979 and stripped of his knighthood. © Getty British art historian Sir Anthony Blunt (1907 - 1983), Surveyor of the Queen's Pictures, at Hampton Court Palace, 1975. He was publicly revealed as a Soviet spy in 1979 and stripped of his knighthood. 1979: Margaret Thatcher exposes the Queen’s art historian, Sir Anthony Blunt as the mysterious ‘fourth man’ in a Soviet spy ring. Blunt passed secrets to Moscow whilst working for MI5 during World War Two, and recruited spies for the Soviet Union. He is immediately stripped of his knighthood, and goes into hiding. Blunt later claims to ‘bitterly regret’ his spying activities, saying he was motivated by idealism. (Bing)

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