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Most of world’s 27 selfie-linked deaths happened in India

New York Daily News logo New York Daily News 18/01/2016 TOBIAS SALINGER

Watch your selfie.

India suffered more selfie-related deaths in 2015 than anywhere else in the world, a report revealed Thursday. Roughly half of the world’s 27 deaths linked to the pictures people snapped of themselves happened in India, The Washington Post reported.

Police in Mumbai, the country’s most populous city, have identified 15 sites around the city as “no selfie zones” after two people drowned in the Arabian Sea in the latest fatal selfie accident Saturday.

“The police will now approach the city's municipality to prevent accidents at such spots due to people taking selfies,” Mumbai police spokesman Dhananjay Kulkarni told BBC. “The municipality may deploy lifeguards and install warning signs.”

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi hasn’t flirted with danger in any of his well-documented selfies. Yet officials in Mumbai labeled a Hindu festival space a no selfie zone last year to avoid bottlenecks in the crowds and possible stampedes.

The new spots where police said taking a selfie “can be dangerous” include popular tourist sites like the Marine Drive promenade, Girgaum Chowpatty Beach, Bandra Bandstand, Sion Fort and Worli Fort, according to BBC.

Tarannum Ansari, 18, and two of her friends slipped off rocks by the sea in the Bandra area while snapping pictures Saturday, the Hindustan Times reported. A bystander, Ramesh Walanju, 37, saved her friends but got swept into the choppy waters trying to find Ansari. Both drowned.

Other India selfie deaths from the past year included three people who died after posing in front of a moving train, seven youths who drowned in a lake after snapping boat selfies and two students who drowned in a canal after taking selfies, according to Indian media reports cited by the Post.

A 66-year-old Japanese tourist who was snapping a selfie tumbled down stairs to his death at the Taj Mahal in September.

World selfie deaths eclipsed deaths from shark maulings in 2015, and America experienced its own share of deaths and risky behavior. A 19-year-old Houston man, Deleon Alonso Smith, fatally shot himself while snapping photos with his gun this past summer.

Officials in Denver, Colo., closed a public trail for weeks after too many people tried to take selfies with bears. The closure followed a California man being bitten by a rattlesnake and a Mississippi woman getting flipped over by a bison at Yellowstone National Park while trying to snap selfies.

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