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What life is like in the northernmost town in the world, where it's dark 4 months of the year and you're told to carry a rifle because of polar bears

INSIDER Logo By Tom Murray of INSIDER | Slide 1 of 34: 
  The world's northernmost town is Longyearbyen, which is
  located in the Norwegian archipelago of Svalbard and has 2,100 citizens.
  It is around three
  hours by plane from Oslo and 650 miles from the North Pole,
  making it one of the most remote human settlements on Earth.
  
  It's dark for four months a year and light for another four
  months. There are also 
    more polar bears than there are people.
  
  Despite its remoteness, Longyearbyen has all the amenities of
  a modern town, including a school, a church, restaurants, and a
  cinema.
  
  It is also the home of the famous 
    doomsday seed vault, which stores every known crop on the
    planet.
  

  Look at the 
  World Atlas list of the world's northernmost settlements and
  you'll see that many at the very top of the list are located in
  Svalbard - a Norwegian archipelago between mainland Norway and
  the North Pole.

  The first settlement on the list with a population worthy of
  being described as a town, though, is Longyearbyen, which hosts
  around 
  2,100 people who have access to a school, a church,
  restaurants, and a cinema.

  Life in Longyearbyen, despite its amenities, is unlike anywhere
  else on Earth.

  For starters, it's dark
  four months a year and perpetually light for another four
  months. Secondly, it's suggested residents carry a
  rifle when travelling outside the town borders - in case they
  run into a polar bear.

  Like many of the settlements in this part of the world,
  Longyearbyen was established as a mining town, though mining
  operations have since been phased out of the area.

  Now, the town is a place of scientific research and adventure
  tourism - it is the home of the famous 
  doomsday seed vault, which stores every known crop on the
  planet.

  Scroll down to see what everyday life is like in this extreme
  neighbourhood.

  Warning: This article contains images that some may find
  disturbing.

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Look at the World Atlas list of the world's northernmost settlements and you'll see that many at the very top of the list are located in Svalbard - a Norwegian archipelago between mainland Norway and the North Pole.

The first settlement on the list with a population worthy of being described as a town, though, is Longyearbyen, which hosts around 2,100 people who have access to a school, a church, restaurants, and a cinema.

Life in Longyearbyen, despite its amenities, is unlike anywhere else on Earth.

For starters, it's dark four months a year and perpetually light for another four months. Secondly, it's suggested residents carry a rifle when travelling outside the town borders - in case they run into a polar bear.

Like many of the settlements in this part of the world, Longyearbyen was established as a mining town, though mining operations have since been phased out of the area.

Now, the town is a place of scientific research and adventure tourism - it is the home of the famous doomsday seed vault, which stores every known crop on the planet.

Click through the slideshow above to see what everyday life is like in this extreme neighbourhood.

Warning: This article contains images that some may find disturbing.

© Shutterstock.com

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