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Ups & downs: the wild story of the flying car

Autocar Logo By Autocar of Autocar | Slide 2 of 29: Waldo Waterman hailed from San Diego. His Arrowbile was never intended to be a flying car. However, when he realised the advantages of its tail-less design meant it was easy to detach the wings on the ground, the design took shape. It first flew in 1937 using a 100hp six-cylinder Studebaker car engine to power both wheels and propeller. Three Arrowbiles competed in the 1937 National Air Races in the USA and six of them were built in total, with the last being completed in 1957. Top airspeed was 120mph – and 70mph on the ground. Where can I see one? An Arrowbile is now displayed at the Smithsonian’s Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia.

Waterman Arrowbile - First Flight: 1937

Waldo Waterman hailed from San Diego. His Arrowbile was never intended to be a flying car. However, when he realised the advantages of its tail-less design meant it was easy to detach the wings on the ground, the design took shape.

It first flew in 1937 using a 100hp six-cylinder Studebaker car engine to power both wheels and propeller. Three Arrowbiles competed in the 1937 National Air Races in the USA and six of them were built in total, with the last being completed in 1957. Top airspeed was 120mph – and 70mph on the ground.

Where can I see one? An Arrowbile is now displayed at the Smithsonian’s Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia.

© PAL-V

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