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13 Must-Know Things About Seasonal Affective Disorder

Eat This, Not That! Logo By © Provided by Eat This, Not That! of Eat This, Not That! | Slide 1 of 14: By Kristen FischerAlong with autumn’s savory fall produce and brightly colored leaves, also comes shorter days. Is the lack of sunlight giving you the blues, or is it something more serious like seasonal depression? Find out, here, plus other must-know facts about SAD.Love the crisp autumn air but hate how you depressed you feel when the sun begins to set while you’re still at the office? You may have Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), or seasonal depression, a type of depression triggered by seasonal light changes. In most cases, symptoms begin during late fall or early winter and start to fade away as the days become longer during spring. However, some people get SAD in spring or summer—it’s just less common. Either way, symptoms include loss of interest in things that you once enjoyed, lack of energy, sadness, feelings of hopeless, difficulty concentrating, a strong desire to sleep, or changes in appetite or weight. Thankfully though, the condition can be treated.“It really is a manageable thing,” Dr. Janis Louise Anderson, an associate psychologist at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, says of the condition.You may have heard about light therapy, or phototherapy, as a popular treatment for SAD. Psychotherapy, medications, and lifestyle changes can also help. There are many things, however, that you may not know about this type of depression, especially when it comes to how it affects your weight. To help you make more informed decisions about your health and weight maintenance strategies, we gathered some must-know information about SAD that everyone should know before the darker days of autumn arrive. Read on to get in the know—and don’t miss these 30 Ways to Be Happier to stay healthy and optimistic year round.

13 Must-Know Things About Seasonal Affective Disorder

By Kristen Fischer

Along with autumn’s savory fall produce and brightly colored leaves, also comes shorter days. Is the lack of sunlight giving you the blues, or is it something more serious like seasonal depression? Find out, here, plus other must-know facts about SAD.

Love the crisp autumn air but hate how you depressed you feel when the sun begins to set while you’re still at the office? You may have Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), or seasonal depression, a type of depression triggered by seasonal light changes. In most cases, symptoms begin during late fall or early winter and start to fade away as the days become longer during spring. However, some people get SAD in spring or summer—it’s just less common. Either way, symptoms include loss of interest in things that you once enjoyed, lack of energy, sadness, feelings of hopeless, difficulty concentrating, a strong desire to sleep, or changes in appetite or weight. Thankfully though, the condition can be treated.

“It really is a manageable thing,” Dr. Janis Louise Anderson, an associate psychologist at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, says of the condition.

You may have heard about light therapy, or phototherapy, as a popular treatment for SAD. Psychotherapy, medications, and lifestyle changes can also help. There are many things, however, that you may not know about this type of depression, especially when it comes to how it affects your weight. To help you make more informed decisions about your health and weight maintenance strategies, we gathered some must-know information about SAD that everyone should know before the darker days of autumn arrive. Read on to get in the know—and don’t miss these 30 Ways to Be Happier to stay healthy and optimistic year round.

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