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Facebook mistakenly deleted some people's Live videos

TechCrunch logo TechCrunch 12/10/2018 Josh Constine

Photo by Maciej Luczniewski/NurPhoto via Getty Images © Maciej Luczniewski/NurPhoto via Getty Images Photo by Maciej Luczniewski/NurPhoto via Getty Images This time instead of exposing users' data, a Facebook bug erased it. A previously undisclosed Facebook glitch caused it to delete some users' Live videos if they tried to post them to their Story and the News Feed after finishing their broadcast. Facebook wouldn't say how many users or livestreams were impacted, but told the bug was intermittent and affected a minority of all Live videos. It's since patched the bug and restored some of the videos, but is notifying some users with an apology that their Live videos have been deleted permanently.

a screenshot of a cell phone © Provided by AOL Inc. The bug raises the question of whether Facebook is a reliable place to share and store our memories and important moments. In March, Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg told congress regarding the Cambridge Analytica scandal that "We have a responsibility to protect your data – and if we can’t, then we don’t deserve to serve you." Between that misappropriation of user biographical data, the recent breach that let hackers steal the access tokens that would let them take over 50 million Facebook accounts, wrongful changes to users' default sharing privacy settings, and now this, some users may conclude Facebook in fact no longer deserves to serve them.

Facebook user Tommy Gabriel Sparandera provided TechCrunch with this screenshot showing the apology note from Facebook on his profile. It reads "Information About Your Live Videos: Due to a technical issue, one or more of your live videos may have been deleted from your timeline and couldn't be restored. We understand how important your live videos can be and apologize that this happened."

When TechCrunch asked Facebook about the issue, it confirmed the problem and provided this statement: "“We recently discovered a technical issue that removed live videos from some people’s Facebook Timelines. We have resolved this issue and restored many of these videos to people’s Timelines. People whose videos we were unable to restore will get a notification on Facebook. We know saving memories on Facebook is important to people, and we apologize for this error.”

a group of people in a store © Provided by AOL Inc. Facebook made a huge push to own the concept of "going Live" in 2016 with TV commercials, billboards and more designed to overshadow competitors like Twitter's Periscope. It eventually succeeded, with Periscope's popularity fading while one in five Facebook videos became Live broadcasts. But in its blitz to win this market, it didn't build adequate safety and moderation tools. That led to suicides and violence being livestreamed to audiences before Facebook's content police could take down the videos.

Nowadays, most users don't go live frequently unless they're some kind of influencer, public figure, or journalist. When they do see something important transpiring, Facebook has positioned itself as the way to broadcast it. But if users can't be sure Facebook will properly save those videos, it could persuade them it's not worth becoming a camera man instead of a participant in life's most interesting moments.

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