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Lounge Review | Aquaguard on the go

LiveMint logoLiveMint 23-05-2014 Seema Chowdhry

It’s the best buy for a trekker, someone with a long commute or a school-going child—a handy bottle that makes tap water potable by removing microbiological impurities such as bacteria and viruses, organic impurities such as chlorine, and odour. The recently released Aquaguard On The Go personal purifier bottle is available in almost 300 cities.

Mumbai-based Shashank Sinha, general manager and head of marketing, Eureka Forbes, says the water is purified instantaneously as it passes through the filter. The bottle works differently from the RO or other water-purifying systems at home though. “Those systems use a different technology—either reverse osmosis, which works in areas where the total dissolved salt (TDS) content is high, or use ultraviolet/ultrafiltration technology for purification. The technology used in this filter is not available yet for large-scale water purification needs at home,” explains Sinha

The good stuff

We liked that the bottle has a water-level indicator on the side, so if you are running low, you can fill up from any water source on the way. Sinha says you can even fill water from clean streams and rivers, not just from taps.

The company claims that the plastic used to make the bottle is non-toxic. Another plus is the double cover which prevents dust from settling on the bottle’s water-dispensing nozzle.

The filter uses “Space Nano Technology with a cartridge life of up to 600 fills with a Natural Shut-of mechanism”. This means that you can fill the bottle up to 600 times and the filter will work, but thereafter the water flow will slow down, indicating that the filter needs to be replaced. Filters can be bought at the locations where the bottle is sold.

According to the fact sheet, the filter removes 99.9% of all bacteria and viruses and reduces chlorine. The water quality complies with IS 10500:1991 standards, the acceptable norm of purity of water according to the Bureau of Indian Standards.

The not-so-good

We had to squeeze the bottle really hard to get the water out from the nozzle. In fact, the best flow of water was when the bottle was at almost 90 degrees to the mouth. The water smelt of plastic (but perhaps that is because it was new and we used it only for a day). The bottle does not have any clip to secure it to a bag or belt, nor does it have a handle. It has to be carried in the hand or tucked in a bag pocket. Also, the water does not remain cool in the bottle. As Sinha says, “It’s not about cold water, but pure water.”

Talk plastic

The bottle, available across Eureka Forbes retail chains, comes in four colours—Black Mystery, Pink Beauty, Pearl White and Racy Blue, and is priced at `595 for the bottle and filter. The replacement filter costs `299.

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