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NanoPhone C is a credit card-sized phone which also works with a smartphone

LiveMint logoLiveMint 14-07-2017 Abhijit Ahaskar

A Russian tech startup Elari has come up with a credit card-sized feature phone which can be used independently or as a Bluetooth accessory to a smartphone. It is called the NanoPhone C and is available in India on Yerha online store at Rs3,490.

What makes NanoPhone C stand out from the usual flock of feature phones is the compact size. It is just 94mm tall, 35.8mm wide and weighs a mere 30g, which is pretty impressive even by the standards of a feature phone. Even the recently launched Nokia 3310 (available at Rs3,310) weighs 133g.

Elari has managed to keep the phone’s footprint in check by trimming the screen size. It has a 1-inch TFT display which can show numbers, messages and time. Most feature phones usually have slightly bigger screens and can run some of the basic Java games. The NanoPhone C supports FM radio, runs on MediaTek’s MT6261 chipset, can play music and accepts microSD cards of up to 32GB.

The phone’s key highlight is that it can be used as an accessory for your Android smartphone or Apple iPhone. Users can connect it to the smartphone via Bluetooth, import the contact book, and all calls and messages on the smartphone will be redirected to it. So you can call anyone while your smartphone remains tucked away in your bag or pocket. It also has a call recorder, so you can record conversations and save them on the phone’s microSD card.

It is ideal for people who still use a feature phone for calling and text messaging, and rely on smartphones for more resource-intensive tasks such as social media, gaming, watching movies and typing mails. Feature phones offer more battery backup and do not have to be charged everyday like smartphones. It is one of the calling cards of NanoPhone C as well.

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However, you can’t use it full-time with a smartphone. With Bluetooth switched on, your smartphone’s battery is likely to drain out a lot sooner than you may like.

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